Sil

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    232
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About Sil

  • Rank
    Alex Kidd (+200)
  • Birthday 01/23/1984

Profile Information

  • Location
    Toronto, Ontario

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.jeremyrobson.com
  • AIM
    streichorchester

Artist Settings

  • Collaboration Status
    2. Maybe; Depends on Circumstances
  • Software - Digital Audio Workstation (DAW)
    Sonar
  • Composition & Production Skills
    Arrangement & Orchestration
  • Instrumental & Vocal Skills (List)
    Clarinet

Converted

  • Real Name
    Jeremy Robson
  • Occupation
    Composer
  • Facebook ID
    577861458
  1. Isn't the chord in question Gb7/Fb? (Gb7 with an Fb in the bass?) This sounds like it's the first half of the common pop progression that would go: Fb Gb7/Fb Ebm7 Abm Because that's a lot of flats, transposed to A minor it would go: F G7/F Em7 Am The two chords in the DT song at 12:04 sounds like the first two chords of this progression.
  2. Are there any plans for a soundcloud-like ability to upload WIPs directly to the site in order to springboard ideas off of the community? Perhaps something with version control to make project WIPs more manageable (ideally with private and public settings.) I always thought it would be neat to tag timestamps in the waveform with constructive criticism. I think it would motivate people to give more feedback and finish more remixes. It would give newbies more opportunity for learning while letting experienced remixers show off what they're currently working on. At the very least it would help me remember if I committed to any projects that have been in the works for the last few years.
  3. I'm really loving the ELP influence in Demon, Fiend & Goddess. That and the Queen-style rock opera in The Impresario and the Morricone-style spaghetti western influence in A Fistful of Nickels make me think if Uematsu ever hears this he's going to be like "Yeah, that's what I was going for all along." It's crazy how he had this all figured out 20 years ago back when many of us were in grade school. That to me is true genius.
  4. I'm interested to know what happened there. Is there some backstory?
  5. Lol, we wanted to show off two of the faster bits, so I guess it's easy to conclude the entirety of the 12 or so minutes might be similar, but it's not. There are plenty of tempo changes and I can assure you that the first part of the piece is very much the march we all know and love, and then it undergoes several variations and transformations.
  6. Instead of long sustained notes for the harmonies, you should have all the instruments play the same rhythm as the snare. There's really no reason to have sustained notes in a march. If this is a piece for beginners have all the low brass (trombones, euphonium, tuba) and bari and tenor saxophones and other low winds (bass clarinet, bassoons) play the same rhythm in two octaves. This will give the performers the confidence to really get into their parts and make the piece sound great. The timpani can play the tonic in the same rhythm until the harmony reaches the dominant. Once you've established a strong rhyhtm you can play around with the notes and start to add counterpoint (if you want.)
  7. I got the abrupt transition idea from listening to the 3x3 Eyes OST. I wanted to get a soundtrack-ish feel without having to make two separate tracks, but that's kind of what it is in the end.
  8. It's been a while, but does anyone have the gig file I made (suzu.gig)? I forgot to back it up and I need it for a project I'm working on.
  9. That chord build up (called a cascade) is actually a reference to a famous piece by Prokofiev, or should I say, famous selection....
  10. I went to school with a Zac Spruthasa. Yes, that is 4/9 but you weren't supposed to get that yet because that part hasn't been recorded yet.
  11. Good work, that's 3 outta 9.
  12. Excellent, you got two of them. Rite of Spring actually appears near the end at 4:28.
  13. Come on, doesn't anyone recognize anything in this? I worked hard to rip off as many composers as I could here.
  14. Elfman's Batman theme is taken from Bernard Herrmann's 1959 score to Journey to the Center of the Earth. I think Elfman admitted this in an interview but it was a while ago.