prophetik music

I want to build you a computer

521 posts in this topic

hey zach! long time no see!

i despise btx. the whole point was for the extreme heat issues that mobos were suffering as a result of the pentium 4 chip, and now that the c2d's are so much more popular there's just no need for a single-core chip like that anymore. crappy buss speeds, too - you pay the same cost for a socket 775 3.0ghz at 800mhz that you do for a c2d at 2.4ghz, but with a 1033 buss. almost the same speed, and the c2d has two cores to the p4's 1.

The Core 2 Duo is actually an assload faster, not even near the same speed. Also, it was more the issue of cooling the Pentium D chips over anything else that made BTX arise. Many OEM companies still use it, as it is technically a less expensive platform, since they can easily cool the processor and everything else with one fan. Saves cost in the long run.

BTX was really a last ditch attempt by Intel to force AMD out of the OEM market at the time, since (conveniently) the BTX form factor does not work with processors with an on die memory controller. This is due to where the memory is placed on the board.

It will likely fade away into oblivion once Intel's new Nehalem processors come into production later this year, as they will have an on die me memory controller.

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I think on this forum that would be especially false.

You'd be surprised.

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Damn. Any chance of you comin' out to the west coast?

No?

Crap.

I could really use a new box; I've been runnin' this one since August 02, and it's starting to show its age.

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i ship, too, you know.

i've already gotten five people asking about the possibility of me getting them a box. by all means, keep it coming!

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I might be interested in late June if you're still up for it -- for now, I need to wait until after my wedding. :P

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Hello? "the prophet" Are you serious about this? Because I am very interested in your offer. How does the payment work? Do I pay you upfront before ordering the parts..? or what?

The problem is I live in Winnipeg Canadia. I believe Winnipeg is pretty close to the U.S though..(really?)

I certainly wouldn't mind the shipping cost..(if it's below $150 mark)

if the deal is reasonable.(I guess slightly[about $200??] below the retail price.[not the individual parts but the whole thing.. you know what I mean])

I don't know maybe I live too far away from you. Where's Houghton NY anyway? Is that New York? The closest I've ever been to the U.S is North Dakota.

The computers(come with warranties and everything) at local "futureshops" always lack two or three features I'm looking for, be it enough rams.. et cetera.

This place called Computer Boulevard(you buy parts from them, they build computers) has reasonable prices.. but they're rather difficult to do business with..

I have the money though.. about $2000 budget(that's about all I can afford) for the computer.(excluding the LCD monitor) But I don't know what cards to get, which motherboard would be compatible with my old hard drives, how much ram is required to run 'Giga sampler' and so forth.

I've been stuck with my old comp(Intel 1.6Ghz,256MB Ram) for 6 years, I did buy a nice LCD monitor,a new MAXTOR hard drive and an OK graphic card but it's still the same old computer. Turns out, the graphic card(RADEON 8500pro 256MB? or something like that) was already 'outdated', the 300G MAXTOR hard drive is not compatible with my old motherboard.(CAN'T use it, just gathering dust) the cords are way too old it's making my computer even slower. I keep racking up more $$. Very frustrating.

I only want the "whole process" to be painless and hassle-free, the cost is secondary.

maybe I'll PM you with questions or details later.

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Wait a minute.. I just looked up your profile. You're only 21?(well about my age) And a major in music education? That's amazing but.. there isn't any degree or certificate related to the computers though.

I understand your goodwill but how can we trust you'll build everything from scratch and have the computer running in a good condition?

Just curious.

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Wait a minute.. I just looked up your profile. You're only 21?(well about my age) And a major in music education? That's amazing but.. there isn't any degree or certificate related to the computers though.

I understand your goodwill but how can we trust you'll build everything from scratch and have the computer running in a good condition?

Just curious.

I can guarantee you that 99% of people out there that work and service computers don't have a degree of any sorts. It isn't something you learn by schooling, and I personally know that the real world experience that I have fully qualifies me to do the work that I do. In this business, you learn by experience.

I can only assume its the same for him. Age isn't really a factor either, as I am only 19.

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Besides anything that you learn in school will be outdated to some extent by the time you finish the course, so the only way to stay current is to get real world experience. I myself am 18, and built my own computer maybe three years ago.

So to sum it up, whenever you buy a computer from anybody that isn't one of the major computing cooperations (Dell, HP, etc.), your buying it on goodwill. Computer technology is evolving too fast for a classroom approach to computer servicing, and real world experience is the only way to stay current.

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best way to stay current is doing, after all. i'll contact you in a bit, griffith.

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I think a value-added service would be to tweak the system for audio/DAW purposes. There are a number of commercial DAW builders and they usually charge a hefty markup.

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as long as you buy an OS through me or through a retail service, i do the OCing, testing, burn-in, and system optimization for people. i know quite about optimizing setups for DAWs, as well, so tweaking systems for DAW usage is definitely something i can do.

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slight bump. i wanted to point out that i've already heard from five OCR people already about building them a computer, and i've worked out details with three of them. =D

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as long as you buy an OS through me or through a retail service, i do the OCing, testing, burn-in, and system optimization for people. i know quite about optimizing setups for DAWs, as well, so tweaking systems for DAW usage is definitely something i can do.

If I weren't in the process of building a computer currently with a friend of mine (I already have some of the parts with the rest of the major components lined up), I'd be mighty tempted to take you up on this, especially considering your offer to optimize for DAW usage. Anyway, it's a cool service you're offering, and I'm glad some people are taking you up on it. Good luck and have fun.

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slight bump. i wanted to point out that i've already heard from five OCR people already about building them a computer, and i've worked out details with three of them. =D

Am I included in that list?

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I am always surprised at how many people would pay you to build them a computer, you just have to ask. Its really quite an easy way to make money if you know what you are doing.

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you need to know about a whole lot of things to make a computer, don't forget. a lot of people aren't as savvy with electronics as the people who frequent this board, don't forget.

and yes, escariot, you count. pm me with dates where you'd have a day or so free for me to come in.

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Its really quite an easy way to make money if you know what you are doing.

Same with writing music :razz:

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i'm now building a box for chrono26 and griffin9. sweet!

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Besides anything that you learn in school will be outdated to some extent by the time you finish the course, so the only way to stay current is to get real world experience. I myself am 18, and built my own computer maybe three years ago.

So to sum it up, whenever you buy a computer from anybody that isn't one of the major computing cooperations (Dell, HP, etc.), your buying it on goodwill. Computer technology is evolving too fast for a classroom approach to computer servicing, and real world experience is the only way to stay current.

Errrrmmm... As a CS major, I beg to differ... somewhat. Yes, it's true you can't learn every detail about building a computer in the classroom or anywhere else short of doing it. You can't learn about this card or that motherboard because yes, a new one premieres in two months. However, you learn the concepts behind a computer. You take Computer Architecture and Organization and learn a fuckton about these buggers work on the micro level. That is something that has not changed significantly since the advent of the personal computer. And when you learn that stuff building one is pretty inconsequential no matter what particular hardware you're working with. Sure, you'll have to learn minutia about how to plug it in correctly and such, but you've learned the bigger picture in the classroom. And that's invaluable.

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I think his point was that you don't learn how to build a computer in school...which is true. I knew (and still know) pretty much jack about hardware even though I was a CS major.

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Well, yeah. But I'm sure you took O&A as well. I don't think it would be very difficult for you to learn to build a machine.

That's my point, and it's the philosophy of liberal arts in general. You don't learn material for a specific profession. You learn enough so that you can adapt to whatever profession you end up in. I think it works out pretty well.

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Well in that case, you learn all the basic skills you need for building a computer in kindergarten when you're putting together LEGOs. :) It doesn't really help to know whether the CPU you're getting is big-endian or little-endian, or any of that extremely low-level stuff you learn in O&A (my friends preferred to call it "Org/ASM" for obvious reasons).

Unless you're actually printing circuits and making your own components from scratch or something...THEN that might come in handy, although an EE major would have a much easier time I imagine. But that's just crazy...I've never heard of anyone even trying that.

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