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View Full Version : If not Mainstream... where?


rig1015
09-09-2009, 04:07 PM
Mods help out. I wasn't sure if this was a workshop topic or community one.

Don't compare OCR standards to mainstream/ or what's already out there.
This has been a topic on my mind since I got here. I've noticed some members subtle suggestions to never use anything mainstream. To that I say-
Absolutely! We should never compare anything here to mainstream because if we did it would only show us what an audience likes to hear within certain genre archetypes. And damn-it, OCR doesn't fit into any genre archetype... except video-game soundtrack... remixes... within a styled genre ... (damn-it there is that genre thing again :roll:) BUT! our remixes don't have to follow any sort of genre archetype... unless you want to do a Rock styled remix... then you might take ideas for your remix from various MAINSTREAM Rock bands to help you get ideas... (and by main stream I mean anything published)

Seriously? I'm not saying make a mainstream product, but I am saying look at it so you have your bearings before you remix. Who should a OC'R look at when getting an idea for better drum patterns? Only OCRemixers? ... Why only them...? so they can regurgitate a sequencing idea that has already passed the panel? ... Are we that afraid of sharing new engineering ideas based on the mainstream?

OCR is #1 because I've noticed it presses a sense of inventiveness upon its remixers. If we only stay in our own little world every remix will begin to taste stale on our ears. Where are we to get our ideas if not from another more main stream source?

So what is it; Mainstream / OCR (only) / or Genre Pioneering?

Yoozer
09-09-2009, 05:15 PM
Why should it be an "either" situation?

"Mainstream" misses the point. The ultimate underground music is played in the cellar of a club nobody goes to by a DJ nobody heard of.

It's not a good definition, and it's most certainly not an excuse to have unpolished work accepted. Most pieces of music for older consoles are short and have a catchy hook - exactly what you'll find in mainstream. Most mainstream music has a slick production; nothing wrong with that.

Most of the remixes are instrumental. That already takes 'm out of the mainstream, because mainstream instrumental music is generally very genre-specific (electro house, trance) or not mainstream enough (when was the last time you saw a drum 'n bass in the Billboard 100?).

rig1015
09-09-2009, 05:21 PM
Why should it be an "either" situation?
Great point.

Harmony
09-09-2009, 05:55 PM
I hate this fear of "mainstream" music that people have. It's like musical homophobia to me. Listening to the radio and taking inspiration from Timbaland will not corrupt your music. Like Yoozer said, what's wrong with slick production value? What's wrong with music that millions of people enjoy? Why do people find it necessary to shun music after it is published (watch out zircon, get any more famous and you'll be ostracized)?

Some music is made for and enjoyed by casual listeners. I can bob my head to it without thinking. I can dance to it without worrying about tempo and time sig changes. By the end of the first time I've heard the song, I already know the hook because it's just that dammed catchy.

Other music is made for and enjoyed by musical connoisseurs, for lack of a better term. People who enjoy music for the sake of music, and like to hear intricacies, and creative melodies, and couldn't care less whether or not it's danceable, or appropriate for karaoke night.

OCRs fall in BOTH categories, and if anyone is worried about whether or not they should sound more or less "mainstream" to get a song accepted on OCR, they've taken one step away from actually getting accepted.

What's with the drama? Take the original melody, re-arrange it, and add some personal flare. Once you have the experience and technical ability to do this proficiently, it is as easy as apple pie to get onto this site with anything from a hip-hop bounce fest to a minimalist jazz masterpiece.

rig1015
09-09-2009, 06:01 PM
Some music is made for and enjoyed by casual listeners. I can bob my head to it without thinking. I can dance to it without worrying about tempo and time sig changes. By the end of the first time I've heard the song, I already know the hook because it's just that dammed catchy.

Other music is made for and enjoyed by musical connoisseurs, for lack of a better term. People who enjoy music for the sake of music, and like to hear intricacies, and creative melodies, and couldn't care less whether or not it's danceable, or appropriate for karaoke night.
Audible connoisseurs, interesting term Harmony.
So I guess a good OCRemix comes from the ability to proportion these points for the two types of typical listeners.

Harmony
09-09-2009, 06:17 PM
So I guess a good OCRemix comes from the ability to proportion these points for the two types of typical listeners.No. "Good" is obviously subjective, but what makes "an" OCR is clearly spelled out in the site info. ANY music from ANY genre that promotes the appreciation, preservation, and interpretation of video game music. The audience is irrelevant. You don't need to appeal to casual listeners, or connoisseurs, or musicians, or judges, or rockers, or Larry, or your grandma.

The only caveat is that the music should demonstrate attention to sound quality. OCR doesn't want a cellphone recording of you playing a Mega Man theme on your Squire over a Casio drum loop for 4 mins -- even if "you" happen to be Yngwie.

Nase
09-09-2009, 08:28 PM
OCRemix is about rearranging the music of games.
Does it have to be any more complicated than that?
What's already on the site doesn't indicate what you could contribute to it.

rig1015
09-09-2009, 09:34 PM
No. The audience is irrelevant. You don't need to appeal to casual listeners, or connoisseurs, or musicians, or judges, or rockers, or Larry, or your grandma.
Honestly, composing like that would just be weird for me. I do make "other" remixes from VG's just for my own sense of love / appreciation / etc. but they seem so... lacking in appeal (or at least what I think would appeal) that I lose desire to share / polish / finish.

I got D-Corrupted (on hold till 19th when I can record choir vocals) and the only reason I share it / work on it, is because I know that theme, would have great appeal.

I guess I'm thinking about the back end too much; it isn't JUST about getting accepted it is also about being there & being a desire to download... does that just make it a product TOO be consumed?

Nase you make a great point too.

Harmony
09-09-2009, 10:10 PM
I guess I'm thinking about the back end too much; it isn't JUST about getting accepted it is also about being there & being a desire to download... does that just make it a product TOO be consumed?I don't disagree. I just see that as a step two. Most of the complaints that I've heard over my years in this community have revolved around not being able to get a mix accepted in the first place. Once you're able to do that consistently, the next step imo is practicing making the people love it as much as you do :)