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SonicSynthesis
12-12-2009, 08:26 PM
I'm doing music in college and part of my course is MIDI Sequencing. We use Cubase but i don't know if that's the best software to use. I'd like to do my coursework at home and i'd also like to become a fellow remixer in my spare time. I'm good at music, infact it's my whole life, but i've had almost no experience with music software. My lecturer is so useless i reckon i could learn things here much faster. So can you give your opinions on which is the best software so i can download it please. I'll be checking out tutorials in the meantime. Kthx <3

Moseph
12-12-2009, 08:54 PM
These programs all basically do the same thing. The reason to choose one over another is because the interface works for you. Some have demo versions or trial licenses (FL Studio, Sonar, Reaper, and Live come to mind). Download some demos, spend some time with each program, compare them to your experiences with Cubase, and use the one you like the most.

If you want compatibility with school stuff, though, Cubase is probably the best bet. Be sure to check academic pricing before you buy anything.

Souliarc
12-12-2009, 08:56 PM
That's a BIG question my friend.

The response I've gotten over time is that it really depends on your own specific needs and your own workflow

I would check out Sweetwater's DAW Guide (http://www.sweetwater.com/feature/daw/daw_software.php) and I would check out this thread (http://www.sweetwater.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25220) from their forums.

I personally use Sonar. I really can't remember what ultimately determined my decision for it, but I haven't looked back since. It's been very good to me. High learning curve, but once you get it, it flow likah watah.

SonicSynthesis
12-12-2009, 09:21 PM
They were saying Tracktion2 would be recommended if you're looking to get into computer based composing with minimum hassle. What are your views on that?

What about Fruityloops, Reaper and Reason?

Edit: I'm going to try out Reaper. It's said to be easier to get into than the others. Sonar is apparently really difficult to set up and use if you don't have much experience.

Souliarc
12-12-2009, 09:45 PM
I'm not versed in Tracktion, but I do know that that's one of the key points they try to make, the ease of use. The same thing can be said about Fruityloops as well though. Please note that the videos a bit old as Tracktion 3 is already out.

Never used Reaper, but some people around here really like it.

I used Reason a little (up to version 3) and really liked it. Love the rack-mounted style and the MIDI sequencing. It had no recording support (though now they have Record, which is a separate buy). The main reason I sold it though is because, for the sake of simplicity, I just wanted to deal with one DAW (Sonar). Not to mention, Kontakt 2 is my main sampler and to expand Reason's sounds, I needed to buy Refills which would not load into Kontakt 2. It just didn't help my work flow within Reason, but alone, it's wonderful.

Yoozer
12-13-2009, 01:28 AM
What about Fruityloops, Reaper and Reason?


Add Ableton Live to that. Thing is - all of 'm have trial versions.

Why not give them a try? All the time you're worrying about what's easier is better spent on reading documentation.

No audio applications are easy in the sense that they require you to think in a certain way. Reaper's just got the big advantage of a proper wiki.

"What's the best X" is in almost all cases the wrong question to ask. It depends on your budget, your needs, and your experience. Without saying what you've already got, what you've already tried, and how much cash you can spend (as a number, not as "lol not too expensive" - because "expensive" means something different to everyone here) the question is useless, too.

Besides, any of those pieces of software is going to need a proper soundcard if you want to get the most out of it and record anything, so don't blow your cash on the Ultra Mega Super Happy Schoolgirl Limited Extreme Edition of whatever, because there's a big chance that you're not going to use all those options anyway.

Zephyr
12-13-2009, 06:08 PM
People new to this sort of thing often just want to know what's the best so they can go buy it, if it was that easy, then the best software would monopolize the market and everything else would either be way cheaper or out of business. People also like to take out a feature checklist and go down the list, then they count up the checks and use it as a basis to decide how "good" the software is. It's like a car, it may look great and have all the options, but if you don't take it for a drive you won't realize that you actually hate how it handles. Try them out, find which one you like, and learn how to use it. They might not all have all the options, but you definitely won't need all the options to start anyways.

SonicSynthesis
12-13-2009, 06:48 PM
Yeah i'll try FruityLoops because a few of my mates use it and they can give me a cracked version.

Souliarc
12-13-2009, 07:24 PM
Yeah i'll try FruityLoops because a few of my mates use it and they can give me a cracked version.

*sigh*

Just so you know, pirating software is really looked down upon here. Nothing is wrong with trying to find out about the software, but when you mention warez, somebody is gonna cloud up and rain all over you.

If you aren't committed to music enough to buy the product to create it and support the company that makes it, then don't use the product. It's simple.

EC2151
12-13-2009, 07:37 PM
That's not exactly the best argument you can make there, Soliarc my friend. Having been on both sides of the fence, I can tell you that people who do that don't do it because they 'aren't committed enough' or they 'don't want to support the company.' No, the truth actually is much less villifying.

But that's not the point of the topic. That's the point of butthurt internet arguments.


As for software....
People who take the college music classes (I'm only in theory, so I wouldn't know enough about them... YET) say that Logic and Reason are what you want to go far, seeing as they are the most 'professional' tools out there, and some of the more versatile (I hear that quite literally, the pros in the music industry use Logic and Reason, like the film score people). I want Logic pretty badly, and when I get the money, probably over the summer, I'm going to upgrade from my current Fruity Loops setup.

Fruity Loops is the most user-friendly of the softwares, and i'm willing to believe it, considering a hack like Soulja Boi can use the demo of the program to make his 'music' and get famous from it. It has enough going on for it so that an amatuer can pick up the ropes of music-making pretty quickly, and it's the DAW of choice for a lot of people, mostly the cheap, seeing as the demo is free and fully functional, and as far as prices go, it's the cheapest of the DAWs on the market. I'd recommend it for beginners. Also, those that master the program make it rival the best of the high-end DAWs have to offer.


I have not used programs like Ableton or Reaper, but I am intrigued by the latter, due to the things I hear about it. I wonder if anyone can post me an example of a song done in Reaper...
Basically, Reaper is, from what I hear, the freeware version of FL, kinda, but it's a little harder to use, but about the same in terms of functionality.

Cubase is another program that gets a lot of praise in the music-making crowd, again, due to its versatility. I'd recommend it, but I would recommend Logic or Reason first.

Finally, for the guy who loves classical music (raises hand), if you want to make music scores, the program that does not have an equal is Sibelius. A new version came out not too long ago, and it really looks sweet. This is not, I repeat, NOT for music-making like stuff on here. It's for the making of musical scores first and foremost, with all of its notes and what-not.

Also, stuff like Finale are useable, but i think they suck, myself.

avaris
12-13-2009, 07:54 PM
The best DAW is the one that works best for you!


Best thing is to demo like crazy over an extended period of time. Depending on what type of music you make that might narrow down your choices some. The best piano rolls are by far:

Sonar
FL
Logic
Cubase

Other programs are really strong when it comes to working with audio on the fly:

Pro Tools
Ableton
Cubase
etc...


It'd be pointless throwing down $500 on Logic or Cubase at this point. Check out the cheap or free ones such as EnergyXT or Reaper. Learn what your type of workflow is then choose wether or not its worth throwing down $500 on something.

Souliarc
12-13-2009, 07:55 PM
That's not exactly the best argument you can make there, Soliarc my friend. Having been on both sides of the fence, I can tell you that people who do that don't do it because they 'aren't committed enough' or they 'don't want to support the company.' No, the truth actually is much less villifying.

The point I'm trying to make is that if you were committed enough to want to put your music in digital/analog form for the world to hear, using a certain hardware/software product, you would save up your money to pay for it. Maybe it isn't an issue of how committed you are to "music", per se, but how committed you are to want to record it. It IS an issue of how committed you are to music though, if the music you want to make requires software.

People getting what they want as soon as they want is a product of the "microwave generation", as the virtue of patience is long gone.

EC2151
12-13-2009, 08:05 PM
"Son, do you really want to make music?"

"Yes, daddy!"

"Well, I won't get you what you want for 7 years. If you presevere in your dedication and do not lose your desire to make music these seven years, then your patience will be rewarded, for I'll see that you truly WANTED it enough!"

"Hurray!"

Again, these arguments aren't exactly the best; the one's you're making, that is. Saying something like "damn kids have no patience" is not really looking at anything from an objective point of view at all, and a little short-sighted.

When I was using a free program years back, I wasn't so concerned that 'ha ha! My impetuous impatience payed off perfectly!', as much as I was "yes! I finally get to start refining and honing my musical technique!" Some people want to pursue their hobby, and saying something like they're impatient ungrateful bastards is just generalizing and kinda dumb.

I want Logic, but I want to own Logic, as well.
Which brings me back on topic!

avaris, you are right that sometimes, these DAWs are very overpriced. However, you can't think of it as buying a video-game; rather, you have to think about it in terms of making an investment. Buying something like Logic or Sibelius is an investment to your musical career, or your musical hobby. Considering buying such products usually allows you to get free updates to the software from the official sites, you usually DO have your money's worth by buying the real thing.

Though trying out a bunch of demos and seeing what you like is always good too.

Moseph
12-13-2009, 08:17 PM
... the most 'professional' tools out there, and some of the more versatile (I hear that quite literally, the pros in the music industry use Logic and Reason, like the film score people)...

I have not used programs like Ableton or Reaper, but I am intrigued by the latter, due to the things I hear about it. I wonder if anyone can post me an example of a song done in Reaper...

Just listen to any song and pretend it was done in Reaper. DAWs don't really sound different, unless you count differences in bundled VSTs.

Also, don't choose your software based on what "professionals" use unless you plan on touting your familiarity with specific software as a resume bulletpoint.

Souliarc
12-13-2009, 08:41 PM
They are no need for insults. I know rationalizing a conversation is hard over the internet, but at least try.

"Son, do you really want to make music?"

"Yes, daddy!"

"Well, I won't get you what you want for 7 years. If you presevere in your dedication and do not lose your desire to make music these seven years, then your patience will be rewarded, for I'll see that you truly WANTED it enough!"

"Hurray!"

So by this conversation, you believe that just because someone really WANTS to do something that they should just take whatever they need to do it without having to be patient about it and save up for it? I really wanted a Nintendo 64 when I was younger, so I mowed lawns for a year until I could save up for it. I didn't steal it. It's called perseverance.

Again, these arguments aren't exactly the best; the one's you're making, that is. Saying something like "damn kids have no patience" is not really looking at anything from an objective point of view at all, and a little short-sighted.

When I was using a free program years back, I wasn't so concerned that 'ha ha! My impetuous impatience payed off perfectly!', as much as I was "yes! I finally get to start refining and honing my musical technique!" Some people want to pursue their hobby, and saying something like they're impatient ungrateful bastards is just generalizing and kinda dumb.

It actually is a simple as "damn kids have no patience". Like I said before, you want something in this world, you have to earn it. It is REAL simple. I never said they were "ungrateful bastards" either, just impatient. Putting words in my mouth doesn't help your case.

Some people do want to pursue their hobby, and like you, many others, and me have done, they used free/inexpensive things.

I don't see how saying people who steal music software aren't patient, is dumb either. I know the exact feeling these people have when they come to this site, and it's a very impulsive feeling when you hear this music, and then want to ReMix yourself. You have to just take a breather and a step back and see what you have to do to get what you need and if you really want to do it.

Or if you think stealing is worth it, then by all means, we all have a choice.

As far as the topic goes Linux Multimedia Studio (http://lmms.sourceforge.net/) is an UNBELIEVABLY wonderful program (not just for Linux) that has close roots to FL Studio. Comes with many sounds and instruments.

EC2151
12-13-2009, 09:24 PM
I don't necessarily equate "Wanting to take the quicker path" with "I have absolutely no patience GIMME GIMME GIMME"

I'm glad you mowed lawns; I love saving money too to buy what I want, but you can't spread money everywhere.
As much as our dads love the "You have to earn what you want" mantra, I think few people turn down something free when offered to them in an easy and accessible manner. Hell, my old man sometimes takes things that people leave in the alleys, like spare lumber, metal, etc. It's idealistic but not necessarily realistic. Again, I don't attach "being allowed to pursue your hobby/interest" the prerequisite of "you have to earn the right to be able to enter this field." I don't, nor do I see it as necessarily a matter of impatience.

But I digress.


As far as professionality is concerned, if you DO want to go into the professional music world, knowledge of those programs IS a big plus (another forum I go to has a guy who is a 'professional' saying that knowledge of Logic or Reason is a very good thing to have on your resume), but I don't tout its professional status as merely an end in and of itself, but rather, I merely tout it because of the availability of many features and techniques present on the programs.

I would suppose you're right, in that a song done on FL will sound the same done on Reaper, sort of. However, the different interfaces and the ability to use them is ultimately what makes or breaks a DAW for a person.

For the DnB crowd, I know a break-core/DnB/etc. guy who uses the program ReNoise (which I believe is free; can't remember), and he loves it very much. For those into that type of music, check it out.

Skrypnyk
12-13-2009, 09:29 PM
For the DnB crowd, I know a break-core/DnB/etc. guy who uses the program ReNoise (which I believe is free; can't remember), and he loves it very much. For those into that type of music, check it out.

It isn't as far as I know. At least I'm pretty sure soc paid for it.

and I'll back up the notion of if you like breakcore/jungle/dnb and want to spend the rest of your life figuring out how to track, renoise is probably your go-to program.

Souliarc
12-13-2009, 10:02 PM
I don't necessarily equate "Wanting to take the quicker path" with "I have absolutely no patience GIMME GIMME GIMME"

I'm glad you mowed lawns; I love saving money too to buy what I want, but you can't spread money everywhere.
As much as our dads love the "You have to earn what you want" mantra, I think few people turn down something free when offered to them in an easy and accessible manner. Hell, my old man sometimes takes things that people leave in the alleys, like spare lumber, metal, etc. It's idealistic but not necessarily realistic. Again, I don't attach "being allowed to pursue your hobby/interest" the prerequisite of "you have to earn the right to be able to enter this field." I don't, nor do I see it as necessarily a matter of impatience.

Everything you are saying is invoking that just because you don't have the money, it's okay to steal, and regardless if you know it or not, it mocks peoples hard work. In that, we will forever differ. Aside from people stealing for food and water and necessities. Music software is a luxury no matter how you spin it. You can't spread money everywhere, no, and not everybody's rich, but where and how you spread your money will lead you ultimately to what you need/want without having to result to stealing, if you have patience and drive.

I don't attach "being allowed" to do anything to... anything. There is no "earning" involved, only honest hard work to get where you want. I quote Henry David Thoreau:

"I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate himself by conscious endeavor."

If you think it, you can do it. Everything will fall in place. For this, you have to have patience. It's a law of life.

For the DnB crowd, I know a break-core/DnB/etc. guy who uses the program ReNoise (which I believe is free; can't remember), and he loves it very much. For those into that type of music, check it out.

I talked to Zwitra a while a go. He said he paid around $45 for the full version. You can use the trial as long as you want, but you can't export audio.

EC2151
12-13-2009, 10:40 PM
Guess i fail at life.

Sorry, bro.

SonicSynthesis
12-13-2009, 11:04 PM
Ok first of all, Wow! Didn't mean to cause arguments.

I take advantage of anything i can get for free because i'm a typical student who barely makes enough to pay rent for his apartment, and seeing as the countries going through this fucked up recession i can't find a job anywhere. This doesn't mean i won't eventually support the software when i can. I'll always download a bands album and make sure i like it before i actually considering buying it. It's it's not that i don't have patience. It's the fact that i need to know this shit for my course by May next year. Now i came on here to ask for advice, not to cause problems. But seriously if you have a problem, then that's your problem, not mine! I appreciate all the advice people have given and i'm still open for more.

Kthx <3

Legion303
12-14-2009, 12:32 AM
That's not exactly the best argument you can make there, Soliarc my friend. Having been on both sides of the fence, I can tell you that people who do that don't do it because they 'aren't committed enough' or they 'don't want to support the company.'

The kid said he wanted to "try" FLS, which he can do without getting a pirated version. If he really meant "I'm going to use this from now on as my main DAW," he would have said that. And in that case, it's worth the money.

-steve

SonicSynthesis
12-14-2009, 01:49 AM
Well do you get get all the features in the trial version? Btw stop calling me kid please. I'm 20 years old...

LuketheXjesse
12-14-2009, 01:50 AM
http://www.reaper.fm

Legion303
12-14-2009, 02:19 AM
Well do you get get all the features in the trial version?

Yes. You just can't save your work, but you're free to use all the synths and features it comes with and export to mp3.

Btw stop calling me kid please. I'm 20 years old...

I'm 38.

-steve

SonicSynthesis
12-14-2009, 02:33 AM
Yes. You just can't save your work, but you're free to use all the synths and features it comes with and export to mp3.

Ugh well because it's for college and it will take a while to work on it is pretty essential that i can save my work...

Souliarc
12-14-2009, 02:47 AM
It's it's not that i don't have patience. It's the fact that i need to know this shit for my course by May next year.

So do you steal your textbooks?

But seriously if you have a problem, then that's your problem, not mine!

Yeah! Screw everybody and their problems with piracy and... and... supporting other peoples hard work!

Alright, I know you haven't stolen anything yet, but you're going about the idea completely wrong. There are SOOOO many free (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_audio_workstation#Free_and_open_source_sof tware) tools out there, (LMMS is free!). You can get enough information from free sources for your course work without having to result in piracy.

SonicSynthesis
12-14-2009, 03:18 AM
I'll try LMMS then. Sorry but money is a very big issue for me right now. Also we get given information to take home in each class, not textbooks, so HAH! :P

avaris
12-14-2009, 03:21 AM
avaris, you are right that sometimes, these DAWs are very overpriced. However, you can't think of it as buying a video-game; rather, you have to think about it in terms of making an investment. Buying something like Logic or Sibelius is an investment to your musical career, or your musical hobby. Considering buying such products usually allows you to get free updates to the software from the official sites, you usually DO have your money's worth by buying the real thing.

Ugh...

I did not mention anything about a DAW being overpriced. The relationship between price and quality is relative and very much within the eye of the beholder. I am going to be frank here and say I appreciate you taking your time to give me potential advice, but I did not ask for it. The having to use a certain type of software to be "professional" is a horrible and awful misnomer that can cause people a lot of time and energy in the long run. Using random people to back up your opinions is a pretty weak attempt to make an argument.

To the OP, usually on any forum questions about "best software" have a tendency to end up like this. The easiest and best way to get good advice on this is to have more specific questions. The more specific your questions, the more people can get to the heart of what you are looking for. Good luck dude. :)

SonicSynthesis
12-14-2009, 03:29 AM
To the OP, usually on any forum questions about "best software" have a tendency to end up like this. The easiest and best way to get good advice on this is to have more specific questions. The more specific your questions, the more people can get to the heart of what you are looking for. Good luck dude. :)

Yeh, seeing as i'm a "midi virgin" i don't really know any specifics about things. I just needed a general idea of where to start. Thanks anyway.

GarretGraves
12-14-2009, 04:17 AM
The point I'm trying to make is that if you were committed enough to want to put your music in digital/analog form for the world to hear, using a certain hardware/software product, you would save up your money to pay for it. Maybe it isn't an issue of how committed you are to "music", per se, but how committed you are to want to record it. It IS an issue of how committed you are to music though, if the music you want to make requires software.

People getting what they want as soon as they want is a product of the "microwave generation", as the virtue of patience is long gone.

While I agree cracking DAWs is dishonest, I don't think lack of commitment is a relevant observation. Matter of fact, I think people may be TOO COMMITED to record music when they have to steal it. The only reason to swipe a DAW off the net is to not spend money. And mostly because people don't have enough money. But they want to record so bad that they have to steal it. So IMO, over-commitment is the problem there.

Rozovian
12-14-2009, 04:49 AM
The problem is entitlement. You don't have to be the least bit committed to download stuff, all you need is to feel entitled to something to think you have every right in the world to get it. And you don't. Combine that with lack of patience and access to the riches of the internet and you have an absurd situation, really. In every other aspect of life you have to work for what you get. Just imagine if you felt entitled to a car, or girlfriend, or anything else that's not downloadable. :P

Also, Emperor, welcome to ocr. The general advice is to lurk a bit before making friends by putting words in their mouths. :P

To the OP: I use Logic, and I do recommend it, but I still think you should try out the demos of other stuff first to try out different ways of doing the same things. It's also a way of learning. I worked for years with trackers, then with GarageBand, and Logic was still pretty daunting when I first opened it. As a midi virgin, you shouldn't start in the deep end. Get the free (as in free beer, not as in stolen beer) stuff from the net, get demos, watch videos, and hang out here. :D

EC2151
12-14-2009, 04:51 AM
I did not mention anything about a DAW being overpriced. The relationship between price and quality is relative and very much within the eye of the beholder. I am going to be frank here and say I appreciate you taking your time to give me potential advice, but I did not ask for it. The having to use a certain type of software to be "professional" is a horrible and awful misnomer that can cause people a lot of time and energy in the long run. Using random people to back up your opinions is a pretty weak attempt to make an argument.


Not so much advice. I'm just striking up conversation here.

I wasn't really trying to make an argument, other than it might not be such a bad thing at all to spend $500 on a DAW if that's what you really want to use and pursue as a hobby or career. I didn't want to use 'professional' in a misleading sense, I'm merely stating that that is (based on what I know and hear from other people) what's used in many cases. While that does not necessarily legitimize anything (it doesn't), least of all one software over another, I feel that I am answering the question by saying that potentially, the different types of software serve different needs and purposes to the one using it.


Also, on an aside, I did lurk a bit, read the rules, try to find out the personalities of folks around here, etc etc, but on a large forum, that can be a bit difficult. I realized halfway through this topic that I am probably not endearing myself to anyone around here in this topic. This is funny, because as of now this is my most posted in topic, giving me a reputation to go from.

So it goes.

The advice Rozo gave is solid though. The best places to START, I've found from consensus, are the programs like GarageBand, FL, Reaper. The DnB guy told me that ReNoise was easier to use than FL, but I'm not going to necessarily take his word on it.

Souliarc
12-14-2009, 06:26 AM
While I agree cracking DAWs is dishonest, I don't think lack of commitment is a relevant observation. Matter of fact, I think people may be TOO COMMITED to record music when they have to steal it. The only reason to swipe a DAW off the net is to not spend money. And mostly because people don't have enough money. But they want to record so bad that they have to steal it. So IMO, over-commitment is the problem there.

Yeah, you're right. I guess regardless if there is an honest person and a dishonest person, both of them can still be committed.

The problem is entitlement. You don't have to be the least bit committed to download stuff, all you need is to feel entitled to something to think you have every right in the world to get it. And you don't. Combine that with lack of patience and access to the riches of the internet and you have an absurd situation, really. In every other aspect of life you have to work for what you get. Just imagine if you felt entitled to a car, or girlfriend, or anything else that's not downloadable. :P

Entitlement. Much better word than commitment. Thank you.

SonicSynthesis
12-14-2009, 01:00 PM
Yeah i'll try FruityLoops because a few of my mates use it and they can give me a cracked version.

Lol that's all i said that started this entire argument. To be honest i'm glad it did, because i feel i've gained from it. It is better to start small and if the freeware versions do that then that's what i'll go for. I'll try LMMS and see how that works out.

Please feel free to continue debating though.

Souliarc
12-14-2009, 04:06 PM
Oh, I forgot to also mention Presonus' pretty much brand new DAW Studio One (http://www.presonus.com/products/SoftwareDetail.aspx?SoftwareId=11). It really looks like a good program and also touts ease of use. You can demo it fully functional for 30 days. The full version is $399 and the artist (LE) version is $199.

The Vagrance
12-14-2009, 05:19 PM
There is no real place to start, and also to some piracy is a totally legit way of getting audio-related gear if you're still a little unsure about it as a hobby (I own all of my software fyi). That said, it will be tempting to download too much all at once. If you're not quite sure about it as a hobby, then download some demos and do a little research on the internet and find some resources or something technical sounding.

Also, in terms of a professional context I've NEVER heard of Logic and Reason being the standard in a "professional" studio. Every studio I've visited or recorded in has used Pro Tools, its pretty much regarded as the industry standard still. I'm not saying that Logic or Reason aren't professional, because they are, as are every other DAW listed. In the end you're focusing too much on the tool because honestly given any DAW and enough time, you can make stuff at a "professional" level.

djpretzel
12-14-2009, 06:03 PM
There is no real place to start, and also piracy is a totally legit way of getting audio-related gear if you're still a little unsure about it as a hobby (I own all of my software fyi). That said, it will be tempting to download too much all at once. If you're not quite sure about it as a hobby, go ahead and pirate a DAW that looks the most interesting along with a soft synth of some complexity and play around, or just pirate Reason because it pretty much smacks those two together.

Please recommend trials/demos instead of piracy on our forums; I'm not particularly judgmental of what folks do in the privacy of their own digital homes, but here on the Workshop forums we really need to avoid endorsing/embracing piracy. When trials/demos aren't available, in those rare cases, consider finding a local guitar center and asking for a demo, or finding a friend, or watching some tutorial vids or something.

Also, in terms of a professional context I've NEVER heard of Logic and Reason being the standard in a "professional" studio. Every studio I've visited or recorded in has used Pro Tools, its pretty much regarded as the industry standard still. I'm not saying that Logic or Reason aren't professional, because they are, as are every other DAW listed. In the end you're focusing too much on the tool because honestly given any DAW and enough time, you can make stuff at a "professional" level.

Ditto that.

Yoozer
12-14-2009, 08:34 PM
Lol that's all i said that started this entire argument.

You're bragging about something that's not legal. Despite what you or I think about the law, this is stupid to admit on the internet that remembers everything.

Please feel free to continue debating though.
Your attitude means I - and others - have to pay more. Thanks a lot.

Here's a good litmus test on software. With what you have learned, can you recreate a simple, classic pop song? Just try to cover something from the Beatles or something. If the sofware, despite what you have learned, makes you feel that it's just not thinking and working together with you to get the job done, you should switch.

SonicSynthesis
12-15-2009, 12:53 AM
You're bragging about something that's not legal. Despite what you or I think about the law, this is stupid to admit on the internet that remembers everything.

What the hell man! I wasn't bragging about anything! I was merely trying to lighten the mood a bit by saying one sentence started this entire argument.

Your attitude means I - and others - have to pay more. Thanks a lot.

What attitude?! I already said i'm trying freeware versions (LMMS)! Maybe you should read the entire thread before you open your mouth and accuse me of something!

Here's a good litmus test on software. With what you have learned, can you recreate a simple, classic pop song? Just try to cover something from the Beatles or something. If the sofware, despite what you have learned, makes you feel that it's just not thinking and working together with you to get the job done, you should switch.

Thanks anyway. You're basically telling me the same thing everyone else has told me. Different software is compatible with different people, but it's not the software that makes people professional, it's the practice. So it looks like i've got all the helpful info i'm going to get. This thread should be locked now.

Edit: Can someone who knows LMMS please help me here - http://ocremix.org/forums/showthread.php?t=26756

Scrap McNapps
12-15-2009, 04:01 AM
Each DAW does the same thing, though some do a bit better in other areas than others. For example, Ableton Live is great for Live performances and loop based production. Cubase is very good for MIDI. Pro Tools is excellent for recording and editing audio. Studio One has a very good setup for mastering. Not to say that they won't do well in everything else, but they may approach it differently and might not be as elegant or easy. (ex. Sonar 8.5 Matrix View vs. Live 8 Session View)

It really depends on the person. I tried FL Studio and I didn't get it though it is probably one of the most user friendly DAWs out there. When I demoed Live, I was able to get into it and it was always a pleasure using it. I may try Sonar again and Studio One again as well cause I didn't give them full out assessment.

Anyways, the best software is one that works with your workflow. Just demo.