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Level 99
05-14-2010, 03:37 PM
Spurred by the thread that involved seeing what frequencies one can hear (I couldn't hear anything above 15 kHz), I decided to snoop around and see what some common documentation of decibel exposure correlating to hearing loss existed.

http://www.dangerousdecibels.org/hearingloss.cfm

http://www.dangerousdecibels.org/teachers_guide/DDB_TRG_Appendices_3.pdf

Maybe I'm not used to looking at this kind of thing so the thresholds are somewhat foreign, but it doesn't sit right with me. Normal conversation at 60 db with no potential hearing loss while stating a busy urban street is at 90 db, which can cause hearing damage at 8 hours exposure? Yes, they may just be examples, but I'd like to get people's input on how they feel common activities (outside of something obvious like full-blast headphones) potentially causing hearing loss.

Hylian Lemon
05-14-2010, 05:30 PM
Dishwasher - possible hearing damage?

._.

Wait, dishwashers are louder than vacuums? Are we assuming the listener is inside the dishwasher? I'd be more worried about the scalding water.

The Dual Dragons
05-14-2010, 05:32 PM
I am currently in China, and I tell you, the drivers are crazy about their car-horns, makes me crazy, possible hearing damage? I tell you, it's used around every corner, by EVERYONE.. AHHHH!!!!

Rosalina
05-14-2010, 05:32 PM
...Leaf blower = rock concert?

...What the hell?

Kenogu Labz
05-14-2010, 05:47 PM
...Leaf blower = rock concert?

...What the hell?

Ever been on the fighting end of one?

Almost as deadly as a rock concert.

Arcana
05-14-2010, 05:54 PM
Your studio monitors can probably push up to 128-135 dB. If you're testing an audio set up, make sure that the volume levels are turned down low because if you blast something from them by accident you'll nearly knock yourself out.

I heard a story along those lines from a friend who was trying to set up his mixing desk and he didn't realise he had all of the levels turned up to maximum, played a test sound, and basically stood there dazed for a few seconds. He felt winded as a result of the sound.

LuketheXjesse
05-14-2010, 05:54 PM
I used to wear earplugs while I blasted loud metal from my car.

Fishy
05-14-2010, 06:09 PM
Can I just say; 90dB doesn't actually mean anything, it's an arbitrary number with no units. 90dBA or 90dBC does, as they give a level relative to a weighting standard. 90dBA will give you permanent damage after 8 hours yes. I don't think a busy street is 90dBA, more like 75, and only if its really busy.

Adding 3dBs is double whatever it was previously, as sound pressure levels vary a lot. (ie 53dBA is twice as loud as 50dBA in terms of sound pressure level)

Basically a level with reference to dBA takes into account the A-weighted equal loudness curve, as we are more sensitive to some frequencies then others. It probably takes substantially more level at 100Hz then it does at 4kHz to cause you damage.

Brushfire
05-14-2010, 08:18 PM
I have -15dB of loss in one ear, -10 in the other!

Goddamn J-pop at 100dBA!!

Kidd Cabbage
05-14-2010, 08:58 PM
I have -15dB of loss in one ear, -10 in the other!

Goddamn J-pop at 100dBA!!


It's God's way of telling you that you don't deserve hearing after that.

Brushfire
05-14-2010, 09:15 PM
Cut me like a knife bro...

But yeah, you are prolly right.

Cyril the Wolf
05-15-2010, 01:41 AM
I have some hearing loss now, but I totally ear-plug it up. Though being to the right of a loud drummer is hell. He has a snappy snare that really cuts through even my ear-plugs.

Agreed with Fishy, the chart shown isn't the best I've seen, but leaf blowers are a lot of white-noise, rock concerts are different sound so...

Rock concerts also sometimes stop being loud for a couple minutes while the Singer yammers.

The Biznut
05-15-2010, 06:58 AM
I used to drive scraper (or a buggy, earthmover, etc.) and It was retarted if you did not have earplugs. I would often go earplugs and then earmuffs, it was so loud.

Earplugs can certainly be a saving grace for your ears and your brain. Good to have some handy for any reason. I usually use them from time to time at concerts, especially when theres a band who sucks, or you just don't like. Listening to horribly loud music that you DO NOT like is torture, and it makes me super angry super fast, lol. Earplugs keep me in the game till the band I like comes on.

analoq
05-16-2010, 02:37 AM
Can I just say; 90dB doesn't actually mean anything, it's an arbitrary number with no units.
True but since dB is meaningless by itself, it is therefore generally considered to mean dB SPL. No pedantry necessary.

Adding 3dBs is double whatever it was previously, as sound pressure levels vary a lot. (ie 53dBA is twice as loud as 50dBA in terms of sound pressure level)
Are you thinking of dBv or other power dB measurements? SPL is 6dB per doubling/halving of magnitude.


Anyways, I always recommend investing in a good pair of earplugs. Ones that will have a hole in them for allowing attenuated high frequencies to pass so instead of everything sounding "muffled" it just sounds quieter. They are especially nice to use at the cinema for one reason: All you hear is the film! You don't hear the obnoxious adolescents talking amongst themselves or other audience noise.

cheers.

Fishy
05-16-2010, 08:44 AM
True but since dB is meaningless by itself, it is therefore generally considered to mean dB SPL. No pedantry necessary.

Well an SPL is fairly useless in terms of hearing damage statistics. It needs a weighting to be relevant. Not trying to be pedantic for the sake of it.

Are you thinking of dBv or other power dB measurements? SPL is 6dB per doubling/halving of magnitude.

Ah sorry you're quite right. SPL is 6dB for doubling. analoq continues to know his engineering shit.