mediaeaters

Contributors
  • Content Count

    14
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About mediaeaters

  • Rank
    Glass Joe (+10)

Profile Information

  • Location
    Austin, TX

Artist Settings

  • Collaboration Status
    3. Very Interested
  • Software - Digital Audio Workstation (DAW)
    Logic
    Pro Tools
  • Composition & Production Skills
    Arrangement & Orchestration
    Drum Programming
    Mixing & Mastering
    Recording Facilities
  • Instrumental & Vocal Skills (List)
    Acoustic Guitar
    Drums
    Electric Bass
    Electric Guitar: Rhythm
    Vocals: Male

Converted

  • Real Name
    Dave
  • Occupation
    Composer, Engineer, Educator
  • Twitter Username
    mediaeaters
  • PlayStation Network ID
    KidA81
  1. I dig it! Highs didn't really feel too subdued to me. Loved the change-up at 1:00 mark, didn't really feel much of a dramatic emphasis when the highs cut at 1:45, though. Cool swung variation at the end, but it did feel like maybe it could have done without and just been shorter? Dunno. I'm new around here Nice blend of modern synths and chiptune-y goodness
  2. In the majority of commercial, mass consumption projects I've worked on, success or failure of "the groove" depends on the artists' ability to play to a click. It sounds a bit backwards, but often it's that metronome-solid tempo that allows us to bob our heads and move to the beat, and changes in tempo (however subtle), may throw off your audience's ability to just lock in and enjoy. Grab any pop/rock/country/hip hop/edm track from the last 15 years and I'd bet you that the majority are an exact BPM from start to finish. I always start out writing to a click/grid, and make sure drums lock to that. Then if all the other players use the drums as their "click," their natural tempo variations throughout the track will allow things to sound tight, but not robotic. Of course this will change dramatically when working with jazz/classical, but the funny thing is that if you ASKED those players to lock to a click, they could do it. Every. Time.
  3. Any specifics on what you're not liking about the second half besides the pauses?
  4. So a bit more work on this one, and it's really turning into a concept piece more than a remix... Here's the basic premise: Ness is working in Dr. Andonuts' lab, hears knocking at door, Pokey/Giygas appears swirling static crescendos until he hears a voice... Then birds. He's awake. It was a dream. Gets ready for the day. All is peaceful...until... There's a knock at the door. http://snd.sc/1333FBY
  5. Really great advice here. Everyone has felt (or still feels) exactly what you are describing, and you've gotten some good suggestions on what to do next. One other thought I had is that while lots of people use FL Studio due to its low barrier to entry and popularity on this site, that doesn't mean it's the one you HAVE to use. As has been mentioned, there are plenty of free/trial versions out there to try and find what works for YOU. I met some AAA-guys/gals at GDC earlier this year and was surprised at the amount of people still using Digital Performer, and increasingly hear of people moving over to Cubase. Lots of stuff to try on for size!
  6. And if anyone does find some cool use for the samples (VGM or no), hit me back so I can get your tracks featured on the group's website
  7. My audio production students and I engineered a drum session that was packaged into a set of loops for hip hip producers and such. My "fee" for the project was getting some cool experience for my students, so I don't make any money off these -- but for $25, you could do much worse! The Unkempt Breaks Collection: http://hiphopdrumsamples.com/products/unkempt-breaks-royalty-free-drum-breaks Here's a link to the SoundCloud demo as well: http://soundcloud.com/drumsamplebroker/the-unkempt-breaks-medley/s-oILGm
  8. From a couple weeks back... Not a remix per-se, but I wanted to challenge myself to work with live musicians and do all the transcription/arrangement/production myself. A bit pitchy in a couple parts, but that's my cost of using "free" musicians! In the end, I think it turned out nicely, and even got a retweet from Mr. Austin Wintory himself http://youtu.be/HAOfgLy2188 Hope you enjoy!
  9. Thanks for the crit. It's supposed to be "sleepy," but if it's coming across as "plodding," well that will never do As for the break between sections, the first part is meant to be a dream state, and I'm planning to add some field recordings of morning-type-sounds to bridge the gap once I find the time. Hopefully that will make the jump a bit more clear. I'll see what I can do to tighten things up, or just create some more interest in general overall!
  10. Hi all, Fresh off my first GDC, I met a few of the heavy hitters around these parts and would love to start meeting/collaborating with all of you. My full time gig is teaching audio production here in Austin, but I'm trying to write more these days, and this site seems like a good place to help push myself a bit. Anyway, on to the tunes... This is a work-in-progress of an Earthbound track I worked up the other day, featuring the cues Dr. Andonuts Lab, Bed and Breakfast, and Because I Love You. I'm not very experienced (yet!) in the chiptune/techno vibe, but for now sticking to what I know. While the arrangement doesn't differ vastly from the original, the instrumentation does -- and I hope to communicate a lot of the emotions felt while playing this game. Easily one of my all-time faves. And if you haven't played it...go buy a copy on eBay for $200 Take a listen and I'd love to get some feedback as I try to get something submitted officially in the coming days! http://snd.sc/17q2luu
  11. Love it!! Live or samples? Assuming live since the post says "acoustic cello?"
  12. LOVE to work with you on this! Got over a decade of big studio experience, and am making the transition to commercial projects and games. Check out some recent work at www.mediaeaters.com and let me know if you still need help. -dave
  13. Not sure if the need is still there, but I'd love to offer my service and collaborate on this. Got over a decade of large studio experience, and TONS of tasty toys at my disposal Examples of recent work can be seen/heard at www.mediaeaters.com -dave