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Petara

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I've seen this movie 3 times and I still want to see it again.

My love for this movie is very similar to the love I have for the Avatar TV series (the airbending one), which is while the story is somewhat predictable, the characters are given strong enough personalities (Neytiri is one of the most intriguing characters I've seen on film in a long time, which is incredibly impressive for someone computer generating) and the world that is created feels so real that it makes the impact of the epic storyline that much greater.

Also supposedly its supposed to be a trilogy, which I both hope and slightly fear.

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I'm so underwelmed by this one...

So many cliche's and predictable outcomes...

So many lost chances for clever humour and originality(script-wise)...

Everyone else who saw it with me loved it and hated me...:sad:

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I'm so underwelmed by this one...

So many cliche's and predictable outcomes...

So many lost chances for clever humour and originality(script-wise)...

Everyone else who saw it with me loved it and hated me...:sad:

I have just the movie to make you feel much better. :)!!

Trust me it's worth watching it.

After watching it, go play Dead Space or Resident Evil 4 to make you feel awesome.

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good movie, definitely an experience visually. Cameron definitely didn't disappoint.

Sam Worthington was much better in this than he was in Terminator Salvation, that's for sure.

Also, Na'vi women are smexy.

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I saw this tonight in 3-D. I'd like to point out the real star of this movie. It's not Sam Worthington. It's not Michelle Rodriguez. It's not even Sigourny Weaver.

The star of this movie is Pandora itself.

I can't remember the last time I was this convinced that something fake seemed so very real.* That alien planet puts the "awe" in awesome. From the lush scenery, the dreamy night scenes, the fully-realized creatures, and the completely believable Na'vi, this place has it all. Breathtaking, amazing, beautiful, etc, etc. Escapism at it's finest.

If you're reading this, and you haven't seen the movie yet, seriously...Go watch it. Just do it. Don't uphold some fool-hardy quest to resist the Hype Machine (it doesn't do anyone any good). Don't cling to your cynical skepticism. Don't be scared by the inevitable rise in furry support. Don't do it because I'm telling you to.

Go see it because you will be happy and satisfied with your purchase. It's as simple as that.

Don't even wait for DVD. This is one of those movies you have to see in theaters. The sights and sounds will blow you away, but only if you allow them to. Just go see it, ASAP. Preferably in 3-D.

*Oh wait, I just remembered: Bioshock is really good with escapism. But still, Avatar freaking rocks!

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First off, I really liked the film. But my enjoyment comes with some baggage.

For one thing, it's sad that such a high concept has to be given such a Hollywood treatment. There are so many places to go with the concept of putting ourselves into alien bodies and experiencing alien cultures first hand and the film has this sense like it wanted to let the audience know it was aware of those things so it touches on them briefly before charging ahead with the usual "humans versus aliens" science fiction battle plot.

I also am upset by some of the racial imagery associated with the film. The aliens draw direct parellels to native americans. Or, I should say, a White Man's understanding of Native Americans. That's the biggest problem with the film, in my opinion. It has a message of befriend nature and the native Americans were right, but as usual, White writers and directors (in this case James Cameron on both fronts) miss the whole point. Being in touch with nature isn't some mystical thing that's exciting and filled with graphic splendor. It's hard work and requires a loss of our comforts and our inflated visions of who we are as a species. Similarly, the Native Americans weren't magical shamans who respected nature because they could talk to it and feel its pain. It was common sense. Shit in your own backyard and you'll have to clean it up someday. Cut down all the trees and you may have a house today, but tomorrow your children won't be able to eat. When you kill an animal, try to end its pain quickly because it's not pleasant to watch anything die in pain. Cats play with their food. Humans have the ability to choose not to do that. That's part of what makes us special. These are common sense things but White people can't seem to ever call it for what it is. They always have to disconnect it with fantastical terms and mystical trappings.

"Oh please," some folk might say. "You can't do anything these days without offending someone." Offending someone isn't the real issue, though. I mean, we took these people's land and murdered their kinfolk. We're kind've past offense. At this point, it's about education. Continuing to propagate a Native American stereotype as being "Tribal" or connecting issues of environment to mysticism isn't particularly an ill-intentioned decision. In fact, in Avatar's case I would say it was well-intentioned. Nonetheless, it's an uneducated decision and that can be dangerous.

Other than that, the film is beautiful, well-acted, and is pushing forward new ways of filming that are going to reshape the industry... at least for those who have the millions of dollars to utilize the techniques. It's also highly reminiscent of Ferngully. There's one scene in particular where I was waiting for Tim Curry to make a cameo appearance and start singing about "slime beneath me..."

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This movie is basically a Dances With Wolves that doesn't suck. And I'm ok with that. I really like the idea of the neural network planet that Pandora is.

Plus, the movie has the most extreme thing I have ever seen. A giant robot jumps out of a burning airship. That's fucking extreme.

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It has a message of befriend nature and the native Americans were right, but as usual, White writers and directors (in this case James Cameron on both fronts) miss the whole point. Being in touch with nature isn't some mystical thing that's exciting and filled with graphic splendor. They always have to disconnect it with fantastical terms and mystical trappings."

youre right that they missed the point if thats what they were going for but in my opinion i dont think they were. They reminded more of the races/tribes in fantasy books i read. Taking the concept of being one with nature and adding a magical element to it. i saw them of more native versions of elves, But i understand and agree seeing it in your POV.

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so maybe i'm looking to far into it, but I think there's something to be said about the whole concept of having an avatar, and how everyone in that planet pretty much has a usb cable attatched to them... do you guys think a movie like this was inspired by the internet?

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so maybe i'm looking to far into it, but I think there's something to be said about the whole concept of having an avatar, and how everyone in that planet pretty much has a usb cable attatched to them... do you guys think a movie like this was inspired by the internet?

Nah... This is really old-scool sci-fi. There's this movie where scientists are trying to go into apes. The diference was that they were only experiencing their minds, not replacing it with their own. Can't remember what was called... But yeah, body exchange is pretty standard...

EDIT: Also, thanks for that video, Mr. Belmont, you are a man of fine taste:)!!

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I think this was, for me, one of the most moving films I've ever experienced. For those 2 and a half hours, I was on Pandora, watching a real event take place, and it was breathtaking. I actually found myself admiring the Na'vi and their shamanistic ways, as well as their literal connection to the ecosystem around them. I'm definitely going to see this at least once more in Imax, and definitely buying this on DVD when it becomes available.

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I think I've figured out why I like this film but disliked District 9. Avatar is pretty much what it is from the very start, whereas District 9 starts off as one thing and gradually becomes something else.

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I haven't read the entire thread, so this may have been said already.

I've heard the following interesting rumors about Avatar:

-It was in development for 12 years because a young kid had a dream for the ultimate sci-fi/fantasy movie that he wanted to see and started writing things down on paper for it at the age of 14!

-They used an entirely new way of filming that put less emphasis on the CG and more and the actors. (for the blue aliens)

-The alien language in the movie is a fully functional language created by a university professor.

I may have misheard that first one, but I could swear I thought I heard Sigourney Weaver say that when she was on the Daily Show recently. If that's true, then we're witnessing a dream come true. And they even produced the video game along-side it. Way to make it happen, Mr. Director!

I was happy to hear that they put so much emphasis on a dramatic story and not just human vs. alien battle action.

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I think Weaver was making a jest at director James Cameron's passion for such a crazy Sci Fi movie. But he did indeed write Avatar 12 years ago.

The third is also true. The language was developed enough to give Tolkein and Klingon a run for the money.

Seeing this tomorrow in 3D IMAX; I am so psyched!

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Also: Neytiri was hot as holy hell.

While I'm never one to express physical interest in other species (I'm only joking), I'll admit she was one of the most realistic CG characters I have ever seen, on par with Davey Jones in the Pirates of The Carribean movies.

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I saw it again in 3D. Here's a question.

when Jake first get's his avatar, there were about 30 of them playing basketball and such...developing coordination for their bodies I assume. Why did we never see any of them again? And also, when the humans were getting escorted into the shuttle where they would go back to earth at the end, I swear I saw Norm's avatar with them. But we saw that get shot during the last battle. And not only that, it said that there were a select few humans that would remain on Pandora. The two they showed that fulfilled this statement was the black guy that Jake said "I need somebody on the inside that I can trust." to. And Norm. He was standing there while his avatar was also standing there. The only thing I can think of is that it wasn't his avatar. But I could have sworn that it was.[/spoiler.

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I saw it again in 3D. Here's a question.

SPOILERS? (Not really, at least not any major ones anyway)

I think the idea is that there were other scientists during this whole deal and it wasn't just the main 3 characters. Problem is though at 2 hours and 40 minutes a lot probably had to be cut, such as going more in depth about it. Supposedly there was a lot more to the script in earlier drafts but it eventually got whittled down and certain characters ether got cut altogether or combined into others.

The avatar at the end does look a lot like the other scientists' whose name I forget, but I kinda of assumed it was just another scientists' avatar instead. It may be that only the scientists stayed behind or something, but really I don't know.

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It's pocahontas in space, I guess there must be something either wrong with the movie or with me, because as soon as the movie ended I couldn't actually remember half of what happened or who was who, like the entire story was one giant roofie.

It really felt like the story was an afterthought in Avatar, it's still an enjoyable movie but nothing in it is particularly filling or commanding of attention, unless you count the visuals then WOW LOOK AT THOSE FANTASTIC LEAVES, HOLY SHIT.

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First off, I really liked the film. But my enjoyment comes with some baggage.

For one thing, it's sad that such a high concept has to be given such a Hollywood treatment. There are so many places to go with the concept of putting ourselves into alien bodies and experiencing alien cultures first hand and the film has this sense like it wanted to let the audience know it was aware of those things so it touches on them briefly before charging ahead with the usual "humans versus aliens" science fiction battle plot.

I also am upset by some of the racial imagery associated with the film. The aliens draw direct parellels to native americans. Or, I should say, a White Man's understanding of Native Americans. That's the biggest problem with the film, in my opinion. It has a message of befriend nature and the native Americans were right, but as usual, White writers and directors (in this case James Cameron on both fronts) miss the whole point. Being in touch with nature isn't some mystical thing that's exciting and filled with graphic splendor. It's hard work and requires a loss of our comforts and our inflated visions of who we are as a species. Similarly, the Native Americans weren't magical shamans who respected nature because they could talk to it and feel its pain. It was common sense. Shit in your own backyard and you'll have to clean it up someday. Cut down all the trees and you may have a house today, but tomorrow your children won't be able to eat. When you kill an animal, try to end its pain quickly because it's not pleasant to watch anything die in pain. Cats play with their food. Humans have the ability to choose not to do that. That's part of what makes us special. These are common sense things but White people can't seem to ever call it for what it is. They always have to disconnect it with fantastical terms and mystical trappings.

"Oh please," some folk might say. "You can't do anything these days without offending someone." Offending someone isn't the real issue, though. I mean, we took these people's land and murdered their kinfolk. We're kind've past offense. At this point, it's about education. Continuing to propagate a Native American stereotype as being "Tribal" or connecting issues of environment to mysticism isn't particularly an ill-intentioned decision. In fact, in Avatar's case I would say it was well-intentioned. Nonetheless, it's an uneducated decision and that can be dangerous.

Other than that, the film is beautiful, well-acted, and is pushing forward new ways of filming that are going to reshape the industry... at least for those who have the millions of dollars to utilize the techniques. It's also highly reminiscent of Ferngully. There's one scene in particular where I was waiting for Tim Curry to make a cameo appearance and start singing about "slime beneath me..."

Just to let you know, I read this post to my wife, who is native american, and her dad, that is very well versed in native american history and studies since he does work for the people in Cherokee NC, and they both laughed and said that you are way off. Just figured I'd let you know.

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