Thrik

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Posts posted by Thrik


  1. Anybody got this yet? I haven't, but I watched some gameplay videos and my god that music. It seems weird to say, but the endless remixes in DKC: Returns turned me off in the end. It robbed the game of its own identity and really just made me crave playing the originals.

    This time the music seems perfectly tailor made for the levels, as you'd expect from Wise. And he's definitely not lost his touch, although I'll be surprised if he's able to match the beginning-to-end splendour of DKC2.

    Whatever the case, buying a Wii U and this game has now become an immediate priority. :D


  2. I'm guessing nobody checks this thread anymore, but anyway: while in a mall the other day I heard a song being played, and was immediately struck by its similarity to the Roller Disco remix in the DKC2 album. Am I going crazy?

    Check out 2:23 of Roller Disco (which sounds like it originates from

    but I might be wrong):

    Then check out 2:07 of this cack:

    It's not the just the melody, but also the use of synths. Probably just coincidence but I found it interesting nonetheless. :P


  3. Can't get enough of Cliffside Climber. It's quite faithful to the original and really takes me back, yet is refreshed enough to be its own work. Also I'm pretty sure I heard the snow level music from DKC1 thrown in there at one point? Can't remember if that happened in DKC3 but it made me smile. Epic Bananas is another favourite, taking one of DKC3's most haunting melodies and turning it into an energy-filled beast. In many ways it would have suited the treetop level where you have to outrun the ginormous saw.

    Winter has a lovely atmosphere, although could use a little more variation to make it truly memorable. Intoxica runs along a similar line, and is exactly the kind of electronica I often listen to outside of the VGM world — this might sit beside artists like Bonobo and Emancipator in my playlist. Breaking the Crystal Key does a great job of retaining the source track's haunting feel whilst giving it a burst of adrenaline, and the oriental influences make it something very unique. Could have gone so wrong if it were any more electronic than it is.

    Friendships Through Dark and Light is wonderful, although strangely immediately evokes memories of Banjo-Kazooie rather than DKC3. Perhaps an omen of where OCRemix's top musicians should focus their attentions next? ;)'Til We Meet Again is a great way to round off the bulk of the SNES music, I always was very fond of that short piece of source music.

    Moving into the later discs, Joyful Jungle Jig is a toe tapper that's fun to listen to although is another track that needed a bit more variation to really fulfil its potential. FrosTronix (Original Mix) is fantastic, really nails the DKC atmosphere I won't even try to quantify any self-respecting remix should strive for and I liked the (perhaps unintentional) nod to Serious Monkey Business's 'Roller Disco' track towards the beginning.

    Dive. This one caught me off guard as I subconsciously expected the tracks stuck on the last disc to be inferior b-sides or something, but this is one of the album's finest. Great mood that does justice to one of DKC3's strongest source tracks, with some quality sax (or whatever) incorporated; I was very pleased when the piano bit I remember most from the source made a proper appearance a few minutes in. Random, but this piece makes me think of Homeland's title sequence music a little.

    The Crystal Key is Broken is the winning Mama Bird interpretation for me, surpassing the previous one which was already superb. The bass is so masterfully handled in this track that the relatively unchanged melody is given a whole new lease of life, and there're endless details to listen to and appreciate — ultimately evolving into a beautiful cacophony that reveals some serious skill behind its composition.

    So, great work guys! That's as far as my track-specific reviewing will go as I really am a busy person nowadays, but it was fun thinking and writing about why I love some of these tracks so much. An incredible way to end the DKC remix album trilogy, and I agree with the sentiment that this is the most consistently high-quality one yet. I hope this isn't the last I hear from the talent involved in terms of interpreting classic Rare music.


  4. Went through all the GBA tracks too, some good stuff there. I was pleased to hear the jungle tune from DKC1 pop up a number of times (look out for the ones with 'Jungle Jitter' as a source, as well as the first Treetop Tumble track), some brilliant interpretations of it. :) I was otherwise unfamiliar with most of what featured, although I think I heard the DKC1/2 Cranky theme pop up at one point.

    Still seems strange to me Wise chose to completely recompose rather than reproduce, as I see what an earlier poster meant about the atmosphere of some tracks (and consequently stages) being transformed somewhat. Not sure I can say it's a good or bad thing, just a curiosity. :)


  5. Got through all the SNES tracks, absolutely splendid. Thoroughly enjoyed the whole album apart from a few inevitable ones I didn't appreciate the genre of so much. That makes three fantastic DKC albums I've seen mature and be brought to beautiful fruition now, although this seems to be the most accomplished album in terms of sheer quality and quantity of music. Almost makes me want to see a second edition of the earlier ones. ;)

    Might try and find time to do a track-by-track review of at least the SNES ones. I'll listen to the GBA tracks when I have time, but as I never played that version I have no appreciation of the source material whatsoever. Are any older DKC themes incorporated into it (as with both DKC2 and DKC3 SNES) or is it completely fresh stuff?


  6. Only listened to a few favourite tracks so far, but I'm enjoying what I'm hearing. I'll happily admit that DKC3 is my least favourite of the DKC soundtracks, but there's nonetheless plenty of quality music and these remixes are doing a great job of emphasising just how good some of the composition was — I'd simply forgotten after not giving it nearly as much listening time as I have the DKC1 and DKC2 soundtracks.

    One revelation that I can't believe I'd never noticed before: the main title theme incorporates both the DKC1 jungle beat and bonus level music. Not sure how that never occurred to me all those years ago but there you go.

    Looking forward to getting through the rest of this monster album. I'm very curious about the GBA music, it seems so bizarre to me that Wise composed a whole new soundtrack for a game he was at least partially responsible for the original soundtrack of. Anyone know why that was? I know he was less involved than with DKC1 and DKC2, was he simply dissatisfied with the result or what?


  7. Whoa, had to come out of forum limbo to comment on this. This is without a doubt the best Metal Gear Solid remix I've heard to date, and what makes it so ironically tragic is that 128kb/s is the best rendition we'll ever get.

    A remix that tackles the whole intro is something I've been interested in hearing and toyed with numerous times over the years, and while this one doesn't quite do that the fact that it kicks off with the same music the game introduces itself with is an excellent nod. To then go through some of the series' finest music just makes it better and better, and while I can hear where some areas could have used some extra polish if the opportunity were there, it's nonetheless an incredible accomplishment.

    Well done! Now get some more made. ;)


  8. Wait, what? The GBA soundtrack is not only different but also by Dave Wise? Wtf. :o

    YouTube won't load for me right now so I can't check it out. God damn.

    Edit: Okay, this is kind of bizarre. DKC3 had fairly superb music, whatever compelled them to completely change it like this? Some of it is pretty sweet, but none of the several I've sampled hit the mood like the originals. Some of the DKC3 music was incredibly haunting, especially Treetop Tumble. Bit weird to hear that replaced with an upbeat Jungle Book-esque groove.

    Still, cool the music exists for remixing. The more music in the album the better. :D


  9. Hate vocal haters with hate. No instrumentals. :banghead:

    I don't hate the vocals, but I would be interested in hearing the instrumental work more clearly. For an album based on a purely instrumental soundtrack surely I can't be the only one with such curiosity? :o

    Kind of like how I like to sometimes listen to metal bands' instrumentals, even if I do enjoy the music with vocals too. You can't appreciate how intricate some of their background orchestration and such is when it's overlaid with vocals, although the vocals add a power of their own. :)

    I don't question the decision to use vocals at all, but as I say it'd have been nice if the bonus disc contained more instrumentals. A clear opportunity to satisfy all.

    Edit: I meant to say actually, the vocal work in A New Place is fantastic — best of the album by far IMO. Major props to those involved!


  10. Just got through the whole thing. God damn, lots of amazing stuff on there.

    My favourites are definitely Rare Respite, How K.Rool Went Insane, Boss Bossanova, Beneath the Canopy, Bad Bird Rag, The Flying Krock, and Castle Crescendo. Not just the interpretation but also the production of these is superb. Beneath the Canopy hit so many nostalgia strings when it changed its tone halfway through.

    Also really enjoyed Monkeys Disarm Their Kremlings, albeit the instrumental version — I don't mind the odd death growl but this track is a bit heavy on it for my liking. Really love how it segues into DKC1's K.Rool boss music.

    Wouldn't mind hearing some of the others without vocals too but I guess that was a design decision and won't happen.


  11. Like most people on OCRemix, I had a small exposure to Reuben's music -- his Metal Gear Solid remixes.

    When he first released his last masterpiece for the game ('Legend of the Snake 2: Snake versus Dragon') I was there, as he was given feedback from myself and others and strived to produce a perfect piece of music. The final result was beautiful and a testament to his musical expertise.

    It seems very strange now, trying to summon a hazy memory of him responding to the feedback from myself and others. I remember him saying how he'd love to use a particular wonderful-sounding Indian instrument more often as it's underused in music, after briefly using it in this piece of music. Just one of many things he'll never get to contribute to the world of music.

    I remember him justifying the way he used his percussion, which I thought was too bold but the end result proved his vision to be correct. I remember him proposing the idea of working a long piano introduction in, which he did -- an emotional piece that hits the heart.

    It might all sound uninteresting, but it's remembering the everyday that makes a death the most hard hitting. Reuben was a hard-working musician and he seemed to live for his music, at least whenever I heard from him.

    Indeed, the one thing that's almost as tragic as his early passing away is that he'll never get to share his gift with more of the world. Who knows what Reuben could have become? But I'd say it's a safe bet he would have touched many, many hearts with his music.

    Rest in piece. I wish all Reuben's family the very best, and I hope you'll find the strength to carry on in the wake of tragedy. It's a great loss, but he touched more lives in the time he had than many people do in their entire lives. Be proud of that.


  12. Man, I randomly thought about this project again just now. I can't believe it's been about 2.5 years since it was completed -- where the hell did time go?

    I've not read much of this thread's continuation so I'd imagine this has already been suggested, but I'd definitely love to see a sequel album (Covering DKC2 of course!) one day become a reality. In my opinion the music in DKC2 is far more appealing, and there's consistently awesome music across the whole board; I can't think of one weak track, which makes for some stunning material to work with.

    I bet people would jump in if it were actually put together, so here's a prompt to anyone with status who feels up to the job: go for it! :D


  13. While reinterpretation is always good, be sure to ultimately give the listeners what they want — to hear the tune they enjoy in full. Throughout the whole thing I was waiting for the more complex bit that's in the original tune to come along.

    As it is you've only got the same several notes playing over and over which makes for a very repetitive listen, no matter how many layers of sound and all the filters in the world you add on top of it.


  14. I know this is starting to sound repetitive, but I too would love to hear a version of this from the original composer without the kick. Whilst it is an interesting and enjoyable listen, the kick gets incredibly bothersome after listening to the piece multiple times.

    And erm, the Ghost House and Castle kind of use the same theme. The Castle just expands upon it and extends it.


  15. Well I offered my support and feedback throughout the project's production, but I'll lay down some thoughts here anyway.

    To put it quite frankly, this project rocks. There is not a single track on the album I dislike (which is an accomplishment in itself, considering that some tracks are of a genre I wouldn't normally even consider touching). The composition on every single one is just pure brilliance, and a huge congratulations is on order for every constributor to the project for doing what they have.

    As well as bringing back the Donkey Kong Country music in a new light as the project intended, it also succeeded in bringing back all those nostalgic memories which make the games so important to us all. As soon as the segment of the first track at 2:50 began, I could have dispensed a tear for the classic game which heightened the quality of my childhood so much. It only gets better as the later tracks do the same - from the incredibly atmospheric Cave Dweller Concert, to One Zero One which manages to bring back the joy of the game in abundance, to the ambient wonder that is Beneath the Surface, to the almost frighteningly well produced Thrash the Plank.

    This album is quite possibly the greatest set of remixes I've ever heard, and I cannot thank all involved for giving me this to forever hold in my collection. It was worth the effort, guys.


  16. This remix is brilliant. The whole thing flows together so beautifully, and the vocals are magnificent. I cannot really find the words to describe the sheer excellence of this contribution.

    And as for Beyond Good and Evil itself, it is tragic that it suffered poor sales. It is quite honestly one of the greatest games that I have experienced in many years - and I've played a lot of games. In my eyes, it even manages to outshine Zelda: The Wind Waker.

    Whilst Zelda wins with regards to its sheer epic size and interaction, Beyond Good and Evil has an epic atmosphere, storyline, characters and soundtrack which you can't forget after playing it. It may not be the longest of games (I finished it in 17 hours, although I didn't collect all of the many items and participate in a lot of the sub quests/games), but the consistent polished quality of the game more than makes up for it (not that a 15-20 hour game is considered short by many people's standards).

    Honestly, if you haven't played this game guys, do so. You won't regret it. I cannot stress this enough - Ubisoft really shot themselves in the foot by allowing this title to fail by not marketing it properly. It's like Grim Fandango all over again - an unbelievable game, but due to bad marketing from LucasArts it suffered terrible sales.

    It took a few years for people to finally try it out and realise just how amazing it was - by which time it's too late for the developers to consider a sequel. It looks like Beyond Good and Evil is on the same path.

    </rant-like post>