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Majiffy

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Posts posted by Majiffy

  1. 1) Don't count out being a studio musician; they make pretty decent money (and by that, I mean more than a touring unsigned band as a whole) yearly.

    2) Internet, man. Other than live shows - which is, unfortunately, where you'll make most of your money - it is INCREDIBLY easy to collaborate and record with artists all around the WORLD. Once you get the fanbase you need to record, then you ship them all over to wherever you are (or go where they are) and fucking play some shows. Dig?

    Message me if you have any questions. I can try to guide/help you out.

  2. $60,000 on a studio for personal projects is just nuts. Most people are lucky to even afford 1/100th of that.

    Ain't that the damned truth. I'm still working on my own personal (albeit, transportable) studio, and I'm looking at a grand total of no more than 2 grand. 4 mic preamps with phantom, ~6 mics, and a lot of isolating foam.

  3. Optimal level for monitors? Depends on your use... For listening purposes, it can range anywhere between 60-80 dBFS (depending on your ability to hear and your hearing sensitivity) or in a playback/venue setting where you're going to lean towards 110 dBFS. That being said, there really is no "right" answer to what level you want to set your monitors at. Very often, engineers will drop it down to zero and bring it up slowly to see how everything they've mixed comes in properly, or from the other end, start off loud and bring it down to see how the characteristics change.

    Essentially, it's something you need to figure out yourself. Sorry! :(

  4. Well for one, if we're talking about storage format then digital doesn't have nearly as many physical limitations in terms of how long your records can be and their dynamic range.

    As for being easier to work with, just compare how time consuming it was to set up and maintain a classic analog studio, compared to loading up a digital software project. Much less time spent on that, more time spent on the actual creative process.

    Thank you.

    Digital doesn't allow for any more 'new' creative directions than analogue does

    First off, it's a lot cheaper and more accessible. That means, comparing a digital world to an analog world, more people have the means to explore creatively. That alone is a strong argument against this statement. Furthermore, we have the ability to code in whatever can be imagined as a plugin, which gives us a hell of a lot easier path to brand new sounds and experimentation. A lot of innovative changes in music in the analog era were by mistake, which makes new findings rare by definition. With intention comes a possibility for greatly increased expansion.

    So yes, digital offers a lot more creative directions over analog.

    I've done the odd tape session with a band. What I like about it is you have to NAIL shit. None of this 'let's do 50 takes and let them edit it later' stuff. Make a decision, was that good enough?

    So true. God, that would save so much time when you have to deal with the perfectionists...

  5. These tracks may appeal to your ominous/dark/lonely/ambient categories, with respect to individual parts of each track.

    These songs were all composed essentially improvisationally, part-by-part. So basically, it would not be hard to create new sonic environments for your game as long as I know the mood I'm going for in each part.

    Apologies for the clicks/pops in the older tracks, I was working with a fried sound card at the time.

  6. Eh the touring would only come into play when we're big enough to financially support international travel anyway. The internet is increasingly applicable for creative collaboration, especially when you consider a lot of revenue and recognition is going to come from licensing rather than album sales, these days.

    Anyway, I'm just putting this out there. If anyone's interested, they can PM me. No need to rain on my parade.

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