Jack and TheBox

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About Jack and TheBox

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    Octorok (+25)

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    Behind the refridgerator.
  1. Well, just looking at some of the names attached, I'd say the quality will be pretty fantastic for a project of this size. I'd say roughly 95% of the remixers are above average quality at worst.
  2. Ah, I stand corrected. Haven't really been following those projects, though, so cut me some slack, eh? =P
  3. Man, this project is becoming an absolute monster. Just having 46ish almost finished tracks is simply ridiculous. Would that make this the largest project in OCR Project history? I'm thinking, "yes". Gotta say, the anticipation for this finished project is killing me. Been killing me. For, like, years. BUT I BELIEVE IN YOU GUYS.
  4. Er, yeah. I suppose what I mean is: I'd like to find it in a better resolution. I'm no picture editing genius, here. I've used tinyeye, but the only picture it comes back with is..well..on Nico Nico Douga. And it's not exactly what I'm looking for, either.
  5. For years now I've been looking for this picture in a decent resolution. Years. Maybe even a decade now. I haven't found it yet, but I feel with the aging of the internet it's GOT to be somewhere. The picture I'm referring to is the character splash page at the very end of the first Wild ARMs' English staff roll. As seen .djpretzel used to use it as the picture for the one Wild ARMs remix a very long time ago (think: green OCRemix), and I actually asked him about it then, but he had no idea where he got it from and the resolution was far too small at the time. So, I'm reaching out to you folks now. Aid me. I have given nothing to you other than interesting links every once in awhile, but I'm at my wits' end. Help a brother out, yeah?
  6. The anticipation I had for this project just skyrocketed out of control. Wild ARMs was the first OST I ever owned. In fact, it was the first album I ever owned, period. That said, the fact that you guys are putting so much effort into this project is incomprehensible. It made me actually try and get a few people together to attempt to record a version of the English credits, but if you have something planned I won't intrude. This is your thing, and I hope it succeeds beyond all expectations. Good luck out there.
  7. No doubt. I do realize it's a teensy-weensy bit too late for any kind of input, but I was just curious as to why it was overlooked, more than anything else, to be honest with you.
  8. Alright..uhh..Don't know what to say here. Just wanted to voice my irrevocable support for this project, and, personally, I can't wait to hear the polished result. I am curious about one thing, however: I see you're covering the Japanese ending credit sequence, but what about the English version? It's more of a personal thing for me, but that staff roll is one of the greatest compilations I've heard for a game. Have you thought about creating a mashup of songs like that for a preview video for the project? I know it's not Michiko Naruke, it's Chuck Doud, but IMO it's a much better song. Just my two cents; I didn't really want to go through all 40+ pages looking for someone else to have mentioned it. Take it or leave it! I'm happy enough just seeing Battle Demon twice. For reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mtMv_tc8FA
  9. Yes, I see what you're getting at. Though I didn't mention it, notice my quotations around the word 'fair'. While this may seem like backpedaling, I did not mean to imply that the definition of 'fair' has equal meaning in both the virtual and real world. To expound, 'fair' in real life basically equates (for a good number of people) to 'karma'. You do something stupid, you get punished for it; sometimes severely. In this case, in relation to games, it is somewhat analogous to screwing up that jump and getting hit by a hawk in Ninja Gaiden. In the game world, however, you have another go at it. Sometimes infinitely. This is where the break comes between real and virtual "fair". If, as real life would have it, you hit that hawk and fell down the pit, you SHOULD (realistically) not get a do-over. However, this is "unfair" to the player who spent a good amount of time getting to that point in the first place. All of it is relative. The game designers thought it would be "fair" to give the player another go. Life dictates that it is "fair" that we die from getting hit by a hawk while we're jumping between high placed rocks, because that is stupid. Now, you look at a bum on the street. Depending on where you live, that man or woman may just be a drug-addled hobo with an alcohol problem and no sense of responsibility. On the other hand, that individual may be the product of a depressing turn of events that put them there; foreclosure, firings, fortune. This, to us and them, may be considered "unfair" in the grand scheme of things. While that person may be able to come back from the brink, it is highly unlikely and the more likely scenario would be that that person winds up pursuing a different life entirely. The above case is, of course, ridiculously simplified and relative. A person's life has any number of circumstantial problems and solutions. A game, though, is all about the second chances. A game will allow the player to pursue an escape, if an escape is possible (and it more than likely is). Realistically, you'll probably never be in a situation where you have to run from the cops because you killed a bunch of hookers with a rocket launcher (or was it cars? I should've quoted..). But because this scenario plays out in a game, the programmers allow the player the ability to escape from this otherwise dead-end. This is considered "fair" in games, and extremely egalitarian in mindset. I'll hold off on any more proselytizing for now, and let others have their say. In any case, thanks Coop for bringing up a valid counter-argument so soon.
  10. Okay, first and foremost, before I get a whole bunch of "PPR PLOX THX", I feel this is more akin to a general community discussion as it deals with something very near and dear to all our hearts: video games. Without them this site wouldn't exist, so we're all bound to have an opinion on this. Also, I don't think the philosophy is too heavy handed, and is much more relevant to a wide group of people. So, without further ado about nothing... I recently discovered Scott Sharkey's Whiteboard videos on 1up.com. You can view them here: http://www.1up.com/do/minisite?cId=3176887 The basic idea is that Scott Sharkey (who is, in my opinion, one of the better gaming journalists out there) draws stick figures doing things while talking about various video game subjects. There aren't many episodes right now so the range is a bit small, but they're all very well thought out and concern themselves primarily with topics that not many video gamers approach. The one that really got my attention was Episode #4: Escapism. It's generally accepted that video games are escapism. How can they not be? They involve the player in a world with strict rules and regulations. As Sharkey puts it, a video game is, above all else, "fair". I had never, ever thought about this before, but he's absolutely right. Reality isn't fair, so video games take a sort of fabrication of reality and make certain events that COULD occur in life more accessible. For example, random chance and circumstance is virtually removed. There is an air of randomness in programming, but in general one can expect to achieve a certain goal given enough time. Life is the exact opposite of this. One could work their entire life, sacrificing everything, and still not achieve the lofty goals that the individual set out with. We play video games, I believe, to experience what true "fairness" is compared to the "unfairness" of reality. To come back to this site, the music is a major part of this escapism. As Family Guy has taught us, people don't have soundtracks to their lives. To be able to witness an event in a video game with a moving score behind it is tantamount to mental bliss for a load of people (myself included). We wish for the ability to have something so epic or moving happen in our own lives. Such is why so many remixes come from RPGs (Chrono Trigger is more than enough to prove my point). This all goes back to being "fair". This "fairness" is our own mental construction of how things are supposed to work, and it's something that we've been inundated with for most of our lives. At the end of the video, Sharkey suggests we make reality more like a video game in order to breach this gap of "fairness". While clearly idealistic and not actually achievable, the idea of making things more egalitarian is a good one. Why shouldn't we treat people with more respect and generosity? Capitalists would argue that that's pretty socialist in theory, but most capitalists are self-claimed Christians. Jesus wants you to make reality more like a video game. This is all conjecture and postulation on my part, but please share your opinions on this subject. If the mods decide this belongs in PPR, so be it. I still believe this needs a broader audience. P.S. To lighten things up, here's a video of a man hand farting his way through Sweet Child of Mine:
  11. Thought I'd pop by and mention an anime I just started watching: Seto no Hanayome I haven't laughed so hard, or so consistently, at something in a long, long time. Check it out.
  12. Alright, time to bust out some random stuff for you folks. Personally, I never really watched anime or read manga until about four-six months ago, but ever since I've been devouring it for some reason. Here are some interesting/great/little known ones that you should check out: Black Cat Higurashi no Naku Koro ni / When the Cicadas Cry Monster History's Strongest Disciple Kenichi Air Gear (if only for the awesome soundtrack) Only check out the anime of Katekyo Hitman Reborn! if you can handle extreme shounen manganess. The manga is a lot better than you'd think, and you get hooked pretty quick. Berserk is a classic but should definitely be watched. It's my personal favorite. And if you don't want it to end how it does (which is incredibly brutal to the viewer), check out the manga. All the current volumes are online and it's still being written (which is amazing considering it's been around for over a decade). The only reason I may deter you from it, though, is that the author tends to take month long breaks between chapters (the next chapter is due in September, for example), and the manga is in no way close to being over. Those are just a few I can remember off the top of my head that really grabbed me. There was one about some weird angel that bashes in some kid's head repeatedly that was hilarious, but I can't remember the title for the life of me. Anyway, enough rambling. Check'em out, but don't take my word for it.
  13. I can't believe Silverhawk got married before me. Crap. Also, congratulations and all that jazz. Always a good thing to see two people get together like that.
  14. As far as I can find there isn't much info as to who the artists are. The duo goes by The Adventures Of Duane & BrandO and they bust out rhymes over old school video game tracks. I believe they're located in Flint, Michigan. Their lyrics tend to rehash the plot lines of the games they cover, examples of which would be: Battletoads, Final Fantasy (obviously), Sonic the Hedgehog, Ninja Gaiden, Little Nemo, Bomberman, The Legend of Zelda, Super Mario Brothers, Double Dragon, and there's also an Earthbound project in the works. They've got an EP available for download on their MySpace page. That's all I know.
  15. It's still available. I'm downloading it right now. The link is a blog post on their MySpace.