Tossy

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About Tossy

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    King Hippo (+15)

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    Edmonton

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  1. Sure would be nice if we had a choice to download a torrent that didn't include the FLAC versions... would save needless download time! However, I must say that the fact that FLAC is being offered is awesome.
  2. I don't remix much, mostly due to a lack of motivation. But this is something I'd like to get into. Naturally, having the responsibility of contributing to this project is more than enough motivation for me (I'm very poorly self-motivated, but very well externally-motivated). Of course, catch-22 comes around: my lack of motivation means I have nothing to show you in terms of audition material suck. actually, that may not be totally true. although I have no game remixes, I do have some other stuff. I'll get back to you with that another time (it's late now, and I'm tired) vgmusic.com tends to have good MIDIs of video game music. go there. I actually have some midi's for the game, downloaded from there. Post this in the remixers forum, too, for greater response. I, for instance, rarely check the GenDisc forum, but frequently visit Remixing (and Unmod). It's relevant to do so (in fact that's probably where this belongs, really...).
  3. SirRus: Make all your accompaniment in reason. Export each track as wav files or mp3 files (whatever... but if you care about sound quality, go wav). Load those tracks into Cubase or whatever you use for multitrack audio. Make sure the accomaniment tracks are lined up. Then play those tracks. As they are playing, play along with your guitar, and record your guitar as yet another audio track (you can probably do this right in Cubase). It sounds like you're trying to match up accompaniment with the guitar (and not the other way around).That'll be mighty tricky, especially if you record that guitar without anything, including a metronome. If you want, sequence the notes of your guitar solo in Reason along with the rest of the tracks, so you have a good idea of what you'll be playing on your guitar. In Cubase, replace the sequenced guitar track with the recorded one.
  4. Are you sure it isn't a voice recording run through a vocoder? In that case, get out your mic, put on your best British accent, and use some kind of vocoder to make it sound synthy. But if it actually is a totally synthesized voice, with a British accent (usually those just come out with a simply "computer" accent, if you will.......)........ I have no idea, man
  5. I think his statement still stands. make a new track in the sequencer, and assign its output to the Filter module. Then it can be automated. (I think that's what he was saying).
  6. "you have to start at the beginning of the song each time you want to hear it" I thought that may be the case... the samples being triggered by MIDI, afterall. Alright, thanks.
  7. I have a question about Reason. I understand that Reason has no audio track capabilities... it's completely MIDI (unlike Cakewalk which does MIDI and audio tracks). So with that I'm wondering how you would incorporate song-length audio (say, a recorded guitar track) into a song you were making partially with Reason. Is it reasonable to load, for example, a three minute long .wav of a guitar track as a sample in Reason's sampler, and play it the whole way through? Is that possible? If so, is it a decent idea, or will that be extremely awkward/unmanageable? The only other method I can think of would be to downmix all your Reason tracks and then combine that with other audio tracks in another program. (Or export each Reason track individually, if you can do that.... can you??) Well?
  8. There isn't another violin instrument patch that sounds better for you? Well, anyway. Have you tried altering the filter on it (in the sampler)? I would try a high-pass filter, maybe, to emphasize the higher freqs while cutting out the lower (warmer) ones. But perhaps more importantly, you'll probably want to increase the filter resonance... that usually makes things sound brighter. Some compression or distortion may make your violins sound edgier.
  9. If you truly want flexibility, sequence the notes yourself. If you need help doing that, try getting a midi of the song (from vgmusic.com, perhaps), and using that for help (or I suppose you could just import it... cheater!) And as for the sound of it, you can either copy samples directly from the wav file (generated from the nsf), or you can make your own sounds with Reason's softsynth (so not only can you emulate the original sound this way, but you also have the flexibility of changing the synth to whatever you want.
  10. As a bit of trivia, I believe the E Piano is quite similar in design to the vibraphone. The E Piano strikes metal bars that vibrate too, but the vibrations are picked up by EM pickups and then amplified.
  11. Check one of the many links posted that included soundfonts. I'm sure you won't have trouble finding a good EP (it might be called just a Rhodes) I have a General purpose sound font called Musica Theoria (it basically replaces the general MIDI instrument library with much better sounding instruments)... it contains (in my opinion) a quite good sounding Rhodes E. Piano.
  12. I have just checked ZSNES and it doesn't appear to have an option for writing outputed audio to disk. But that's just fine, assuming you're using Windows (because it's what I use). Go into your Windows volume control window thingy. Go Options -> Properties. Select the radio button called "Recording". Make sure "Wave" (or similar) is checkmarked in the below list. Click OK. Now, under "Wave", make it selected. Now your computer will record all wave output. Open a program that records sound--sound recorder will work just fine. Start recording. Then just go to zsnes and make whatever sound you need. The one problem is music... which is more than likely there. I don't know if you can disable music with zsnes, but I don't think you can. Try another emulator maybe?