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Anyone have experience with NES repair kits?

17 posts in this topic

I have done the pin connector replacement on mine. And yes, it does work. I got tired of randomly putting in games, blowing on them, putting them in, blowing on them, cleaning them, etc. I think the connector I bought was 13 bucks on ebay too like, a couple years back. Easy to install and use.

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I don't know if you really need a whole kit to do it, but replacing the pin connector does work wonders. If you've ever replaced anything in your computer you can easily swap out a pin connector on your own without directions. It's also good, though not as essential, to get some electrical-connector cleaning solution and apply it to the pins of your cartridges with a q-tip.

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I don't know anything about the repair kits, but I have repaired a NES in the past without replacing the 72-pin connector. It's a bit tedious (you have to manually bend half the connector pins back into shape), but the results were successful: my brother's NES now works with every game; no flashing blue screens, no cartridge blowing. It makes the games harder to put in (I've heard a new connector does this as well), but it's well worth it.

EDIT: Using a bit of generic electronics contact cleaner goes a long way as well.

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Kits are not required to replace the 72 pin connector. I was able to replace it without any kind of instructions. After the replacement, I haven't had a single problem with my system.

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It is very simple to resurrect your NES by just bending your pins back in place. It's not that hard, just a small pain. It's much more worth it to do it this way, otherwise you're going through someone else to buy product (which means money) and waiting for it to arrive. All of this isn't necessary. So, just crack it open and bend the pins.

After you do this, your NES should work even if you don't push the game down. This benefits you in the way that it lasts much longer than it originally did.

When you bend the game down, it bends those pins. Game Genies were also designed in such a manner that because you can't press the game down, it had to put more pressure on the pins to make the connection. So, that's why using them would give you a higher rate of success, but would also wear your NES down much faster.

Not to worry though, because this fix will do you for many years to come, even if you have to perform this fix many times. When it actually becomes so weak that it makes no sense to keep doing it (a month between) then *that's* when you need to go buy a 72-pin connector.

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Well I went ahead and bought a 72-pin connector replacement instead of the kit. It was only $10 and totally worth it for a new one. I've had to use my game genie a lot to keep the NES working and its just been a total PITA. Yay can't wait for it to work well again! Also got Mega Man 2, 3, and 4 on the way.

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I don't know anything about the repair kits, but I have repaired a NES in the past without replacing the 72-pin connector. It's a bit tedious (you have to manually bend half the connector pins back into shape), but the results were successful: my brother's NES now works with every game; no flashing blue screens, no cartridge blowing. It makes the games harder to put in (I've heard a new connector does this as well), but it's well worth it.

EDIT: Using a bit of generic electronics contact cleaner goes a long way as well.

Oh man, this is how I fixed my friend's NES. First, there was a spider and its little nest of eggs smooshed inside the machine itself. Even after I cleaned it out it still didn't work. Bending all those pins back was frustrating but it really does work. A little nerve-wracking, though.

My NES is 23 years old and still going strong. For a period of years, Super Mario Bros 3 would freeze at the ending for me but after I gave my NES a good cleaning with compressed air and rubbing alcohol, it worked like a dream.

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Super Mario Bros 3 would freeze at the ending
That's actually part of what drove me to attempt fixing my brother's NES. The last time I attempted to play it, it locked up as I tried to enter the last door.

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I got my new 72-pin connector and replaced it. Everything works great (well the NES games that I owned as a kid work, some of the ones that have been given to me later on, not so much) with one little quirk. The games typically don't work if I push the spring loader down into the locked position. Instead, I just push the cartridge in and leave the loader up. I assume this isn't really a problem, it just makes me wonder if I put the NES back together slightly wrong or something.

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Instead, I just push the cartridge in and leave the loader up. I assume this isn't really a problem, it just makes me wonder if I put the NES back together slightly wrong or something.
I noticed the same thing with my brother's NES after I fixed the connector, so most likely you put everything together correctly.

On my brother's NES, you can load the cartridges normally, but sometimes you have to jiggle it around a little before it works properly. Usually pressing the cartridge down and moving it as far forward as possible does the trick.

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I'm thinking the "locking" thing was more of a gimmick anyway, to make it seem more like a VCR.

Yeah, after my situation occurred I had to wonder why they made people push the cartridges down anyhow.

Do the top loader NES's have a better life expectancy? A friend of mine was thinking about buying one.

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Do the top loader NES's have a better life expectancy? A friend of mine was thinking about buying one.
From what I've read, they generally work better and last longer, but they lack the RCA A/V output jacks found on the original NES.

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From what I've read, they generally work better and last longer, but they lack the RCA A/V output jacks found on the original NES.

I personally don't even use those as sound only comes out of one speaker as opposed to using coax. I need to get some kind of split cable or something.

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I personally don't even use those as sound only comes out of one speaker as opposed to using coax. I need to get some kind of split cable or something.
Believe me, the improved picture quality is worth the cost of a Y RCA cable for the sound.

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