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Metroid Prime ReMix- The Hope of The Galaxy


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It was just a figure of speech. It means: lacking some more texture.

Not sure you should get everything up to the snare level.

It would probably end up clipping in the end.

But definitely lower the volume on it, then work on the dynamics of the mix.

I really can't give you any better advice now, as you already got the structure down.

So imo, the only things left to do are a bit of tweaking & a bit of mixing.

Then try mastering the beast in order to become the Hope of the Galaxy.

Failure is not an option here.We're counting on you! ;-)

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-Your a little harsh on your hi-mids, highs they are over EQ'd (freq- 1kHz to 5kHz)

-You mix is thin, meaning I boosted your 500Hz buy about 3.5dB on a wide Q (0.18) and whole "middle" of your mix came to life.

Neblix if you want to become a master of the EQ you should do some learning about ELC. It stand for equal loudness contuer. Ever wonder why the bass or boom can sometimes muffle or seem louder than hi-hats? Ever wonder why your songs curve the way they do on your EQ analyzer, wonder why you get a bump in the low end a roll off on the hi end? Understanding the ELC will allow you to EQ like.... a ninja.

~1:47 clavi-tone scales down here; your delays are heavy... if it isn't delays then your MIDI tap-echo is too high a velocity after original note. You could automate the delay so the wet (delay) doesn't tap quite so fast after the original note.

I like all the added items and synths that you made. It doesn't break away hype, but the arrangment and overall feel are solid. The mix has beef with the freqs but that is an easy fix.

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-Your a little harsh on your hi-mids, highs they are over EQ'd (freq- 1kHz to 5kHz)

-You mix is thin, meaning I boosted your 500Hz buy about 3.5dB on a wide Q (0.18) and whole "middle" of your mix came to life.

Neblix if you want to become a master of the EQ you should do some learning about ELC. It stand for equal loudness contuer. Ever wonder why the bass or boom can sometimes muffle or seem louder than hi-hats? Ever wonder why your songs curve the way they do on your EQ analyzer, wonder why you get a bump in the low end a roll off on the hi end? Understanding the ELC will allow you to EQ like.... a ninja.

~1:47 clavi-tone scales down here; your delays are heavy... if it isn't delays then your MIDI tap-echo is too high a velocity after original note. You could automate the delay so the wet (delay) doesn't tap quite so fast after the original note.

I like all the added items and synths that you made. It doesn't break away hype, but the arrangment and overall feel are solid. The mix has beef with the freqs but that is an easy fix.

It's not an easy fix for me.

"I boosted your 500Hz buy about 3.5dB on a wide Q (0.18 )"

Can you tell me what that means?

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It's not an easy fix for me.

That is because you haven't learned about the magic of the frequency spectrum, once you understand better what the human spectrum is you'll be able to make these "quick fixes"

"I boosted your 500Hz buy about 3.5dB on a wide Q (0.18 )"

Can you tell me what that means?

Only because I like your mix I wrote you this story;

:: First ::

Things you should know about EQ's that are consistent:

Equalization is basically the boosting or cutting of specific frequencies. We call it Equalization instead of freq boosting / cutting because it "equalizes" the frequencies into a nice even response.

EQ's are normally defined in quality by the number of bands the EQ itself has. A 10 band EQ is going to be "better" than a 2 band EQ. Is it really "better"? No, it is the mathematical algorithms that give the EQ its sound that make it "better". You'll probably want to stick with using plug-ins since running the concept of out-board gear by you would take ... too long.

The easiest way to define bands is- the area in which you can alter the frequencies. Take a look at the example link; example of a Waves 10 band EQ. See how many points there are? 10 in total. Each of those points is a "band." Ta-dah!

The next thing to understand is Gain. Gain is a value on each band that controls how much you boost or cut the frequencies. On the example link, it is the value next to the "TYPE." So if your band is at 1kHz and you turn your Gain up +3dB you'll here a more Mid-range tonal appear. The more you turn Gain up the more resonant it is. You should be a bit familiar with Gain because of dealing with inputs and faders in your DAW.

Next is Frequency. Frequency is used in so many tech trades you better get your head around it now. Normally it means how often something occurs; so in audio engineering its how "often" does the vibration occur. Our ears as humans can only hear form 20Hz (low / Bass) to 20kHz (high / Shine). Most EQ plug-ins work within this range so they can boost or cut anything that the human ear can hear. On the example link Frequency is next to value is next to the Gain value. A good EQ will let you move any band to any Frequency.

And now it is Q. Q is probably the trickiest thing to understand on EQ's. If you look at the example link- at band #3- see how it makes a spike? When you change your Q value that spike will either get thinner or fatter. The Q on band #3 is rather narrow The lower value normally means thinner and higher value normally means fatter, but each EQ is different; move the value on yours to see which way is which.

:: Second ::

Now that you understand the terms:

All I did was apply a EQ plugin on the audio track I loaded you song onto, and then applied those values.

"I boosted your 500Hz buy about 3.5dB on a wide Q (0.18 )"

Translated:

Gain - +3.5dB

Freq - 500Hz

Q - on my it was 0.18 which was wide, 1.0 is default so I made it wider. This value could be anything depending on EQ but I basically I had it wide.

:: Third ::

Now I only told you ALL this because I EQ'd your mix like this and I liked the way it made it sound. It sounded thicker, more full. All in all there are a number of ways you could fix this problem; one is doing the method I suggested. This method does have a big con though: what ever you do to the EQ you do to the WHOLE mix. Another suggestion is taking another pass at the mixing end and playing the faders more towards the 500Hz tonal frequencies. This could be tricky if you're not really seasoned on audible mixing. You could phase cancel other frequencies to boost the missing ones but I don't even want to get started on MS techniques.

This is all the art of audio engineering. Enjoy.

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That is because you haven't learned about the magic of the frequency spectrum, once you understand better what the human spectrum is you'll be able to make these "quick fixes"

Only because I like your mix I wrote you this story;

:: First ::

Things you should know about EQ's that are consistent:

Equalization is basically the boosting or cutting of specific frequencies. We call it Equalization instead of freq boosting / cutting because it "equalizes" the frequencies into a nice even response.

EQ's are normally defined in quality by the number of bands the EQ itself has. A 10 band EQ is going to be "better" than a 2 band EQ. Is it really "better"? No, it is the mathematical algorithms that give the EQ its sound that make it "better". You'll probably want to stick with using plug-ins since running the concept of out-board gear by you would take ... too long.

The easiest way to define bands is- the area in which you can alter the frequencies. Take a look at the example link; example of a Waves 10 band EQ. See how many points there are? 10 in total. Each of those points is a "band." Ta-dah!

The next thing to understand is Gain. Gain is a value on each band that controls how much you boost or cut the frequencies. On the example link, it is the value next to the "TYPE." So if your band is at 1kHz and you turn your Gain up +3dB you'll here a more Mid-range tonal appear. The more you turn Gain up the more resonant it is. You should be a bit familiar with Gain because of dealing with inputs and faders in your DAW.

Next is Frequency. Frequency is used in so many tech trades you better get your head around it now. Normally it means how often something occurs; so in audio engineering its how "often" does the vibration occur. Our ears as humans can only hear form 20Hz (low / Bass) to 20kHz (high / Shine). Most EQ plug-ins work within this range so they can boost or cut anything that the human ear can hear. On the example link Frequency is next to value is next to the Gain value. A good EQ will let you move any band to any Frequency.

And now it is Q. Q is probably the trickiest thing to understand on EQ's. If you look at the example link- at band #3- see how it makes a spike? When you change your Q value that spike will either get thinner or fatter. The Q on band #3 is rather narrow The lower value normally means thinner and higher value normally means fatter, but each EQ is different; move the value on yours to see which way is which.

:: Second ::

Now that you understand the terms:

All I did was apply a EQ plugin on the audio track I loaded you song onto, and then applied those values.

"I boosted your 500Hz buy about 3.5dB on a wide Q (0.18 )"

Translated:

Gain - +3.5dB

Freq - 500Hz

Q - on my it was 0.18 which was wide, 1.0 is default so I made it wider. This value could be anything depending on EQ but I basically I had it wide.

:: Third ::

Now I only told you ALL this because I EQ'd your mix like this and I liked the way it made it sound. It sounded thicker, more full. All in all there are a number of ways you could fix this problem; one is doing the method I suggested. This method does have a big con though: what ever you do to the EQ you do to the WHOLE mix. Another suggestion is taking another pass at the mixing end and playing the faders more towards the 500Hz tonal frequencies. This could be tricky if you're not really seasoned on audible mixing. You could phase cancel other frequencies to boost the missing ones but I don't even want to get started on MS techniques.

This is all the art of audio engineering. Enjoy.

I get it now, I guess.

Thanks for the explanation... I guess I'll just do it the way you did it. If i can figure out how.

This is the plug in I use

http://flstudio.image-line.com/help/html/img_plug/plugin_fx_FruityParametricEQ2.jpg

I don't how to change the Q value like you said.

And I know what frequency is. xD

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My first guess would be the BW values, those little nobs under the frequency nobs. Second guess would be the #5 area where it says HiQ... that might be how you make it a really narrow spike... as you select each band see if that lights up a little or if you can select it for each band. And the #2 area is the gain area for each of the bands...

7 bands...

#1 and #7 are shelf / filtering EQ bands

#2-6 are notch EQ bands

Edit:

You know you probably have a wide enough Q by default on your #4 band give it a subtle boost on the master fader and see what happens.

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Okay so just up number 4? (BTW the picture I gave you isn't the EQ on my song the was from the Image Line Website)

And I'm pretty sure HQ means "High Quality" (as in better sharper display of the frequencies of the song, when I play something through the EQ the stronger/louder a frequency is the more yellow that area gets)

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