Sign in to follow this  
MikeViper

Best place to find people looking for composers?

Recommended Posts

Hey, MikeViper here. I'm a freelance composer who's currently looking for work. Previously, the Gamemaker Community was a pretty good place to find those looking for composers. But with the layout changes it has made it a bit for difficult to find people looking for projects.

So where are the best forums or sites to find people looking for composers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here ya go, it's a list of indie-game development forums

http://www.pixelprospector.com/the-big-list-of-indie-game-development-forums/

Honestly though, if I may offer some tips...

If you want to do serious composition work, I would avoid forums as much as possible. A far better approach is to actually go out there and network with developers at industry events, IGDA meetings, or getting in touch with local developers. I have only gotten one serious composition gig via an indie forum. 9 times out of ten, you're just going to get people who want you to work for nothing or will "profit-share" with you or more likely, tell you there is no budget but you should do it for the "exposure" on their game which has no marketing budget either and almost certainly will never be finished.

Best of luck, though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here ya go, it's a list of indie-game development forums

http://www.pixelprospector.com/the-big-list-of-indie-game-development-forums/

Honestly though, if I may offer some tips...

If you want to do serious composition work, I would avoid forums as much as possible. A far better approach is to actually go out there and network with developers at industry events, IGDA meetings, or getting in touch with local developers. I have only gotten one serious composition gig via an indie forum. 9 times out of ten, you're just going to get people who want you to work for nothing or will "profit-share" with you or more likely, tell you there is no budget but you should do it for the "exposure" on their game which has no marketing budget either and almost certainly will never be finished.

Best of luck, though!

Thanks, I'll definitely check that forum out.

I might also even check out industry events. That's stuff like E3 right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, I'll definitely check that forum out.

I might also even check out industry events. That's stuff like E3 right?

E3 is the top industry event, as is GDC. However, I would suggest looking at local industry gatherings in your area. The major conferences can be pretty pricy, and without a profile or base you'll be another ant in the colony.

Every metropolitan area has at least some gaming/nerd conventions, and if you're lucky there may be a few indie devs showing off their prototypes (MAGFest has a few of them I know). If not, look up local game devs and ask if they have a monthly/weekly meeting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, I'll definitely check that forum out.

I might also even check out industry events. That's stuff like E3 right?

Well, for something like E3 you basically have to be established and be able to verify your professional connection to the industry to attend.

What I mean is just find out what's goin' on in your area as far as video game developers go. Is there some kind of indie or even major events that go on in your area where these people go and the public can attend? The answer is usually "yes", you just gotta do some digging and maybe travel a little bit. Something that's cool is the IGDA, which has chapters all around the world and it's basically where local indie devs get together and network. Thing about it though, is that one person is in charge of their respective chapter, so not every chapter is super active and meets up regularly.

Video game themed concerts and tournaments are another worthwhile thing to check out, because often professionals in the industry are in attendance.

Doing the same things, just with the film-making community, is how I recently got a paid gig composing music for an action short-film.

Even with networking, it's hard to get a gig, but I find that if you go out there and make friends (don't sound like a salesman in dire need of work) and take a genuine interest in their work, they'll usually take a genuine interest in your work as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've had the most luck with the classifieds at gamedev.net. Posting your own doesn't seem to be very helpful (or it hasn't been for me)

They never are, because that's the job everyone wants, so that's the job everyone gets lazy and cheap to get jobs for. The supply exceeds the demand 25-fold, and I've learned in my unfortunate experienced and observation, musicians really aren't generally that good when it comes to business and networking smarts. They really just think making a free post on that stuff will drive jobs in.

I've seen so many "XFIRSTNAMEX XLASTNAMEX: Music For All Your Media" threads, I could puke.

The real luck is waiting for someone new to start something up, not have a composer yet, and post on it. You beat everyone to punch, and cut as many throats as you can until you seal the deal. This may just sound like cynical, burnt out, bitter bullshit, but even if you believe me, the learning curve for how real that is is steep.

Edited by Meteo Xavier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You beat everyone to punch, and cut as many throats as you can until you seal the deal. This may just sound like cynical, burnt out, bitter bullshit,

^

It's really not bs, it's just how this day and age works. There's a time and place for "nice guy"; getting work is neither.

If you do get work, however, make sure you maintain charm (respectful, funny, etc.). People have to like working with you or they won't ask you again.

I was going to work with someone on a game OST and he was just... behaving like a child, making demands and dodging my questions about proof of concept and such. Try to avoid these types; I know I will and I just saved wasting a lot of time and work for something that never really got off the ground.

Also, it may be worthwhile trying to nudge yourself GDC; I managed to do it by marketing myself as a composer, even though I'm actually a programmer in game technology (didn't have this job at the time of registration, so I couldn't really put it just yet). If you get the Audio pass (super $$$ i know) you can attend a lot of really cool panels, some of which are designed to point you in several valid directions for trying to get work. There are table areas filled with just small time game devs hanging out, you could go around, make some friends, they might ask for your help on their next project if they like you (not as a composer, but as a friend). Don't expect to build $$$ here, expect to build relationships. The money will come with patience and nurturing/expanding those relationships until one day, someone who needs a composer will be recommended you by one of your friends, like "What about that cool ass MikeViper motherfucker?".

Edited by Neblix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that I found that really helps is to genuinely get excited about someones game project. Try to not just be the composer. I think showing my attempt at wanting to be a team player has helped me a lot more than skill. Also, remember that there's a lot of cool stuff to do out there than just video games. Like Neblix said, build relationships.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with everything said here. Meeting people locally is the best way to go.

An additional option, if you're currently in college, is to make friends with other students in film/art/programming. Many colleges, mine included, require a senior project for undergrads and a capstone project/thesis for master's students. I've found that a lot of people either want to do a movie or a video game. Get on board with them; it might not pay upfront, though some people do mange to sell their "college game" (thatgamecompany). More importantly though, you've made a game with people who are getting degrees and are serious about making games. After college, you guys may all go your separate ways, but you're likely to be on their mind when they need a composer down the road, or if they're working for a company, they might recommend your name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this