Jump to content

Native Dialect

Contributors
  • Content Count

    143
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

About Native Dialect

  • Rank
    Goomba (+100)

Profile Information

  • Location
    California

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA-MBhBSUewOn6dheufa0Rg

Converted

  • Biography
    Educator, musician, gamer

Artist Settings

  • Collaboration Status
    3. Very Interested
  • Software - Digital Audio Workstation (DAW)
    Logic
    Pro Tools
  • Software - Preferred Plugins/Libraries
    Zebra2
  • Composition & Production Skills
    Arrangement & Orchestration
    Drum Programming
    Lyrics
  • Instrumental & Vocal Skills (List)
    Acoustic Guitar
    Electric Guitar: Lead
    Electric Guitar: Rhythm
    Flute
    Piano
    Vocals: Male

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I am a huge fan of the music Capcom's sound team produced during the CPS era. My theory is that older games have better music because the composers had such crude tools. In order for the music to be listenable in the past, the composer had to focus on creating a strong melody. Now, everything sounds like incidental music because real instruments are available. That all said, thank you for listening to my arrangement. The most common suggestion I receive on these forums is to work on my mixing when it comes to my guitars. I may have to start listening to my final mixes on more audio set ups in
  2. The Savage Land theme has always been one of my favorite video game music compositions, most likely because of its passing similarities to Isao Abe's better known Sagat theme from Street Fighter II. I tried my hand at reinterpreting the song with a bit of a grunge flavor by way of an aggressive drum sequence reminiscent of something Dave Grohl would have played for a Nirvana song. Though it softens the grit of the song, I retained the orchestral elements from the original composition because I believe it gives the piece an almost cinematic quality. Song Title: "Berserker Rage" (Wo
  3. 1) Thank you for takin the time to listen to my remix! I appreciate it. 2) Believe it or not, the bass is actually a saw wave, at least primarily. I have a soft saw doing the panning, while a fat saw is centered specifically because I was trying to avoid having the sound being aurally overwhelming. I guess I failed on that end lol. I also incorporated a tuba played at a lower register so that I could get a more distinct "wub wub" sound similar to the one in Follin's original composition. 3) I agree with you on the synths, but none of GarageBand's stock pads can effectively play stac
  4. This is my second remix from the soundtrack to Spider-Man and the X-Men: Arcade's Revenge, and while every piece of music composed for that game is absolutely brilliant, there is no question that Gambit's stage theme is the most popular of all the tracks. My approach to this remix can be summed up with a single word: "big." I wanted the sound to be big, and the arrangement to feel big, so the drums and synths are fat, the guitars distorted, and the organ blazing. This is the second iteration of my remix, as I was ultimately unsatisfied with my first take. The changes were minimal, but importan
  5. Rather than create a new post, I thought it better to keep the board clutter to a minimum, and simply add the updated information to my existing thread. I truly gave my best effort with my previous remix, but after doing some deep listening, and properly juxtaposing my remix and the source material, I felt there was room for improvement, so I decided to revisit my Twilight remix, and give it a few updates. Changes include: - An 808 kick added to create a deeper bass tone - An entirely new drum beat to give the music more intensity - Additional repetitions of the shakuh
  6. I've been having a lot of trouble recently with my bass EQ. I don't have monitors, just a pair of basic Logitech speakers with a subwoofer, and that's made it difficult for me to gauge how things turn out across different sound setups. It's been a problem for me not just with this remix, but with a lot of my recent remixes (-_-) I'll definitely work on fixing the bass mix for this track. Thanks for the feedback!
  7. Sonic the Hedgehog was the last movie I saw in theaters before the pandemic, so I've been on a whole SEGA nostalgia kick with my remixes. Flying Battery Zone is one of those compositions that ably demonstrates what the Sega Genesis sound chip can accomplish in the hands of a master composer, so I welcomed the opportunity to put my own spin (no pun intended) on the piece. The bass line is bananas! I don't feel that I got the violins right, but after five hours of arranging this track, I had to draw a line and upload it, otherwise I'd never be done, and no one would get to hear the music lol. I
  8. You are one of the most consistent remixers on YouTube, and for that reason I've long appreciated your work. You have an excellent collection of synths, basses, and drum kits, all giving your compositions a very distinct sound that readily makes your work aurally identifiable. One day, I hope to approach your level of production skill so that my own work will be as well polished. Keep it up!
  9. In celebration of the forthcoming release of Final Fantasy VII Remake, I have created a remix of the FFVII Victory Fanfare. My remix is defined by the use of distorted guitar to change the texture of the soundscape. I wanted my version of the fanfare to have a gritty tone, symbolic of the gritty nature of actual combat. Victory never comes easily, so even if you emerge as the winner of a battle, there is a lingering tenseness. It is my hope that my take on the victory fanfare will musically reflect that sensation. I may submit this work to the judges, even though it does not meet the two minut
  10. 1) I agree with your criticism of how the guitar sits in the mix. After having listened to the track a few dozen times without headphones, I realized that I should have either raised the volume on the guitar track, or at least panned it to the left so that it could be isolated from the rest of the mix. At the time, I felt that the guitar was overpowering the horns and violin, which are the parts of the arrangement that I want most to stand out, but that may not have been the most effective choice. Funny enough, I have a Sagat remix that also incorporates horns and violins, but because I wanted
  11. Jin's heroic march is clearly an homage to the themes of old Super Robot anime such as Getter Robo, and Mazinger Z, and as such was composed as an orchestral piece rife with horn blasts, and violin swells. However, Marvel vs. Capcom was one of the last games developed for the CPS2 arcade hardware, so the theme was never properly realized given the limitations of the CPS2's audio hardware.. My arrangement was crafted with one goal in mind: modernize as much of the instrumentation as possible so as to realize Yuko Takehara's original vision for Jin's theme. Unfortunately, even my attempt at
  12. 1) I concur with your assumption that the judges would likely reject your submission, as it does not have any variance in structure from the source material. Having said that... 2) Your take is still quite enjoyable. Incorporating guitar in place of the original synth pieces gives your arrangement a more aggressive feel that reminds me of the score to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. While this community favors adding new measures to remixes, I share your belief that there are times when it is nice to listen to a cover rather than a remix. Sometimes, new instrumentation is sufficient,
  13. My goal in creating this arrangement was to produce something soft in texture, and moderately more upbeat than the source material. I incorporated wah wah guitar, a simpler drum pattern, finger style bass, a koto, and a tremolo synth. The end result is something faithful to the motifs of the original composition, but divergent from its more aggressive aspects (e.g. the sub bass, and layered drum pattern). For those of you that are curious, the song title, "hayai kaze," means "swift wind" in Japanese. When I think of a ninja running through the night, I think of the movement of a swift wind, so
  14. Most Sagat remixes are downtempo, heavily jazz influenced, or otherwise arranged to be suitable for relaxation; my approach to Sagat's theme was quite the opposite. I drew most of my influence from the drop d guitar rhythm found in the Street Fighter Alpha 2 arrangement, while keeping to the structure of the SNES version from Street Fighter II: The World Warrior. The end result is what I consider to be an aggressive, yet regal take on Sagat's iconic theme. The time signature for this piece is 11/8, just like the original, and let me tell you, it made creating this remix quite a challenge, espe
×
×
  • Create New...