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GarretGraves

Question about putting an album out using a drum machine

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Hypothetical question.

If I were to release an album using a drum machine, could money be made off that? Is it frowned upon? Are there any laws regarding such a thing?

I ask because it's something I've never heard of and I'm currently working on a double-disc album using all that I have in my home studio which includes Superior Drummer and Addictive Drums. As well as EWQLSO and other virtual instruments. I've yet to study music law or the like so was wondering if it were possible.

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Hypothetical question.

If I were to release an album using a drum machine, could money be made off that? Is it frowned upon? Are there any laws regarding such a thing?

I ask because it's something I've never heard of and I'm currently working on a double-disc album using all that I have in my home studio which includes Superior Drummer and Addictive Drums. As well as EWQLSO and other virtual instruments. I've yet to study music law or the like so was wondering if it were possible.

I'm not sure I get it.

If there was anything illegal about making an album where the drums are created via drum machine....we may as well just sue every electronic music producer ever.

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I'm not sure I get it.

If there was anything illegal about making an album where the drums are created via drum machine....we may as well just sue every electronic music producer ever.

I figured. But what about it being a good idea? Would it sell?

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I figured. But what about it being a good idea? Would it sell?

Music that is correctly marketed to its target audience is what sells. If you were unable to get a live drummer for your album, big deal.

Video game soundtracks did and still do use sampled or synth orchestra. People still buy the games and listen to the soundtracks.

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Music that is correctly marketed to its target audience is what sells. If you were unable to get a live drummer for your album, big deal.

Video game soundtracks did and still do use sampled or synth orchestra. People still buy the games and listen to the soundtracks.

That game OSTs. I'll assume it's the same for an album. Coo!

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Bands like Meshuggah use drum sampling all the time, and they sell well. The album Catch 33 was all drum samples, and that sounds great! If you like the style that is...

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Wouldn't using CDBaby or Bandcamp or something make it a lot easier to release the album? :D

On a serious note: I'll echo ACO, just find the right audience for it. I'm guessing real drummers would be bothered by the fakeness of it, with the possible exception of those that can appreciate the writing behind the sound (if it's good writing). If it's done right, most ppl wouldn't be able to tell the difference.

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If you think your album will sell/not sell because of drum machines you have bigger issues than just the drum machine.

So:

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Worry about other things.

Worst a drum machine could do is that whatever samples it has are just not right for the kind of music you make. I wouldn't try to sell a Linn or an 808 as realistic when the rest is just plain garage rock or something and you're supposed to have a real kit around. The Linn would be desirable for chillwave or w/e Com Truise is called, and the 808 would do great for electro, both cases where a real kit would fail completely. Won't work. (unless you pull this off and it sounds good, then congrats, you've created a new genre of sorts)

Care about the end result, not about the process. The only people caring about the process are not fans of your music anyway or not listening to it in the same way as the general audience. There is no cheating in music; there is only lying.

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There's an easy way to answer your question without actually having to ask it.

Tedious, but easy. Read the terms and conditions agreements when you install the software. They're there to answer questions like this.

Most sample libraries and synths don't care, though.

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There's an easy way to answer your question without actually having to ask it.

Tedious, but easy. Read the terms and conditions agreements when you install the software. They're there to answer questions like this.

all they usually say is don't make a sample library with our sample library.

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my point exactly :)

actually they do care, it makes em happy. more people are hearing their sounds. your name might just become heard enough for them to put it in their portfolio.

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