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zircon

What keyboard should I buy?

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That's bizarre, I've never seen something like that before, I find it odd that they would make a combination like that, maybe a keyboard with USB ports for a mic or something... Hope you had exactly 37 keys in mind.

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Wow. That actually looks pretty sweet. The 37 keys might be a little small, but everything else looks nice. I have another question though, before I buy it. This is going to be my first keyboard and my first foray into remixing and all that, so I don't know the basics of all this. The keyboard says it has all sorts of different guitar sounds and such, but can I still use it with soundfonts on my computer? Would I be able to use it with programs other than the one that it comes with/is designed for? I guess that was two questions. Oh well.

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You could possibly use that with soundfonts, but you'd have to have a second way to record audio, probably a good, low-latency soundcard. You'd do something like this: you'd record MIDI (or play it live), sending the MIDI data to the soundfont player. The soundfont would play, sending its signal to your soundcard's output. You run a cable from your soundcard's output to the Toneport KB37's input, and then get your DAW to record the input from the KB37.

You might be better off buying a larger MIDI controller and a Line6 Pod or other multi-effects processor though (or, if you're a guitarist, even consider a Line6 amp with the Pod functionality built in). I'd bet the KB37 is limited in terms of the effects it has compared to other Line6 products, and if you want to play keyboard as well, 37 keys isn't a big range unless all you're doing is single-hand lead lines.

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You could possibly use that with soundfonts, but you'd have to have a second way to record audio, probably a good, low-latency soundcard. You'd do something like this: you'd record MIDI (or play it live), sending the MIDI data to the soundfont player. The soundfont would play, sending its signal to your soundcard's output. You run a cable from your soundcard's output to the Toneport KB37's input, and then get your DAW to record the input from the KB37.

That sounds pretty crazy. Why wouldn't you simply record the midi data and play the soundfont that way? And even if you wanted to record audio, why don't you just route the output of the soundfont player into the DAW's audio recorder? Sending the signal out from the soundcard to the keyboard and then back in is unnecessary. In fact, the keyboard IS a soundcard. It does D/A and A/D.

It should never be more complicated than this picture toneportkb37_setup.gif

if you want to play keyboard as well, 37 keys isn't a big range unless all you're doing is single-hand lead lines.
True to that.
I'd bet the KB37 is limited in terms of the effects it has compared to other Line6 products

Same exact sounds/effects as the tone port UX2.

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That sounds pretty crazy. Why wouldn't you simply record the midi data and play the soundfont that way? And even if you wanted to record audio, why don't you just route the output of the soundfont player into the DAW's audio recorder? Sending the signal out from the soundcard to the keyboard and then back in is unnecessary. In fact, the keyboard IS a soundcard. It does D/A and A/D.

I may have misinterpreted his request. What I said is necessary if you want your soundfont audio to be processed with effects from the KB37. If, on the other hand, you just want to play on the keyboard and record clean audio, or use software effects, than what you said is correct. I have yet to do it, since I usually play live instead of recording, but I've got the setup to use my PodXT for external effects on a MIDI track, like I described. If I were doing that, I'd probably want to record both the MIDI from the keyboard, audio from the Pod, and possibly MIDI automation from the Pod, much like recording a dry and wet signal for a guitar, so that you can change the effects later.

Anyway, Diemer, the KB37 should work as a MIDI interface, so any DAW or other recording program that can record MIDI data and use it to drive a soundfont should work with it.

Same exact sounds/effects as the tone port UX2.

I think the PodXT does more, and the Pod X3 almost certainly does. All depends what you want, really, in terms of effects and whether you want them in hardware or software.

Edit: I took a look at the KB37 page, and here are some things you should know.

1) It does not appear to have any effects done in hardware, although I'm not certain on that (check the manual here to make sure). Effects are done through the Gearbox software, if not through hardware.

2) The version of Gearbox that comes with the software is standalone. To use Gearbox within another host, including the bundled Ableton Live Lite, you'll probably need to purchase the Gearbox plugin for $100.

3) The KB37 doesn't have any MIDI inputs or outputs, so if you have any other MIDI gear, other than expression pedals, you're out of luck.

I'd say that this product is only good if you want a simple MIDI keyboard and audio interface that does effects in some way, you're fine. If you're a keyboard player, you'll want something with more than 37 keys. If you just want an audio interface, there are cheaper alternatives (because they won't have a keyboard included). I'd say this product hits a very small niche; make sure it's what you want before you spend money on it, because there are other good alternatives.

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I don't see any problem with it, although I noticed it didn't mention velocity sensing anywhere, (but I'd just assume it's in there).

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If you're using software with lots of soundfonts and effects and whatnot, does it really matter if your keyboard has voices and effects of its own?

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If you're using software with lots of soundfonts and effects and whatnot, does it really matter if your keyboard has voices and effects of its own?

You can probably spend the same amount and get a better-quality controller with no sounds (although you won't be able to perform live with it unless you haul your computer around too, which isn't a big deal if you have a laptop; I do that every couple weeks). It's quite easy to get better sounds than a cheap, low-end keyboard with free or inexpensive plugins.

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Is that Toneport kb37 pretty unique in terms of keyboards that can also record guitar? Are there others that could do the same thing, maybe with a better quality keyboard?

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I won't guarantee any of these are any good, but I went to Kelly's Music & Computers (the place I buy my gear from here in Canada). They have a wizard for selecting keyboards based on what you want. Here's the list of all keyboards with soundcards; some or all of them should be able to accept a 1/4" input from a guitar.

EDIT: The link doesn't save your search results; you'll have to go through the wizard yourself (it'll take you ~15 seconds) to get to the results. Remember to pick keyboards that are also sound cards.

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Compatibility is never the problem. You either have an USB port on the back that acts as a MIDI interface or you have (or should get) a USB MIDI interface.

The problem is that those keyboards have onboard sounds (useless if you use plugins only) and no rotary knobs or sliders.

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The first post defined synth action, hammer action and semi-weighted, but what about when it just says "velocity sensing" or "touch sensitive"? Where do those fit in?

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Velocity sensing just means that it can read how hard you hit/press the key, it is a common trait in almost all keyboards, it's unrelated to key action.

Chances are that the keyboard is synth action and they're just not telling you. If it were semi-weighted or hammer action they would make a point to tell you.

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Ok, so velocity sensing is the keyboard detecting how hard/fast you're hitting the key, and synth action/hammer action etc is just how much it feels like a piano?

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Ok, so velocity sensing is the keyboard detecting how hard/fast you're hitting the key, and synth action/hammer action etc is just how much it feels like a piano?

Yep, that's it.

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As if I hadn't posted in this thread enough....

I WILL get one of these, just curious about opinions of other people - I intend to use it with FL studio 8.

http://www.zzounds.com/item--KORK61P

http://www.zzounds.com/item--MDOOXYGEN61

http://www.zzounds.com/item--BEHUMX61

I'm leaning towards the Behringer, but the Korg is getting really good reviews. :whatevaa: hmm

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I suppose posting in here is more relevant than making my own thread. But I am looking into buying a digital piano in the near future. Though I read zircon's recommendation for the Yamaha P70, I felt that Casio's Privia PX120 (or PX110 is just as good). I'm not too sure what the difference is between the two, but I can get the PX110 off of Amazon for a cool $405 USD new.

http://www.zzounds.com/item--CASPX120

I went to Guitar Center and found the keys on the Casio keyboards to be stiffer and the sound to be a bit "brighter" compared to the Yamaha ones. Maybe someone was banging a lot on the displayed Yamaha ones though... you never know. I'm not looking too much feature-wise. Sure MIDI out is a great addition, but not a requirement. I'd probably have to buy an adapter if I want to connect it to my computer via USB. I'm just looking for something with good keys (weighted and velocity sensing) and not too much outside of that. I'm just going to be using a piano for.. piano-ing... The reason I'm going digital is that it's pretty convenient to move around and I could use headphones whenever I want too.

Anyone have own one of these or have an opinion on them?

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since Casio and Yamaha appeal typically to different markets on the large scale, you usually get more bang for your buck by getting a Casio. Privia vs. P85 (the new P70) is a great example. You have a few more instrument patches as well as features like tune and transpose, and a few basic drum patterns in addition to the ability to record a little.

I would say that generally, I prefer Yamaha's action to Casio's, but only slightly. They're both very comparable. The Privia is a good choice, and it'll save you some money. Go for it.

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