Wiesty

Jazz appreciation thread anyone?

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Speaking of Jazz, for those that might to get some learning in, this free course started this week: https://class.coursera.org/improvisation-005

I'm in that course too; great stuff so far.

A lot of good suggestions in here; I'm going to add Snarky Puppy. They're a fusion band with funk, gospel, and hip-hop influences (several members have done a lot in the Dallas gospel and funk scene, and their usual drummer has played with Marcus Miller and Snoop Lion). They record all their albums live now, making a DVD in the process, and they've got all kinds of groove and memorable, singable, melodies, but there's also a lot of complexity in what they do, without sacrificing appeal to those who don't like weird chord progressions or melodies. Here's a few links:

- Probably their most popular tune. A ballad with a great synth line and some African influences.

- They're usually instrumental, but did a project last year where they invited a number of singer friends of theirs to arrange a tune with the band and record them in concert. This song won them a Grammy for best R & B performance - the singer sings a few chords in a breakdown near the end of the song.

- One of my favourites from their latest album. Their usual drummer had Visa problems and couldn't get over to Holland for the recording session, so they brought in a drummer from Toronto (my home town) who I'd met before. Larnell Lewis is definitely near the top of the list of the best drummers in the world.

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Looks like you're into "dixieland" (jazz style), then.

Or gypsy. Django rox.

Also @ metal man: A lot of later Zappa stuff could be labeled as jazz in spirit, though i know of nothing that really sounds like jazz jazz.

But he's totally rhythm&blues based, and did complex, experimental, everchanging stuff. Sort of an alternate reality jazz, if you will.

Edited by Nase

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I like the ancient stuff. Doesn't get better than old school. 1890-1945. :3

Of the newer stuff: Bill Evans Trio,

, and for fusion, Ozric Tentacles is fun.

Edit: is there anyone else who loathes horn solos in jazz? Wood or brass, the only solo wind I can stand is flute.

Edited by Xelebes

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Edit: is there anyone else who loathes horn solos in jazz? Wood or brass, the only solo wind I can stand is flute.

I haven't gotten to that point. I thought this sax solo at 3:43 was really good.

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Saxophone and trumpet solos are literally the greatest solos in jazz and you are literally Hitler for not liking them :banghead:

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Lou reed and laurie anderson doing jazz, wut. I haven't been keeping up.

Ozric Tentacles i remember as v cool but having little to do with jazz.

I like horns.

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Lou reed and laurie anderson doing jazz, wut. I haven't been keeping up.

Ozric Tentacles i remember as v cool but having little to do with jazz.

I like horns.

OT, like many examples of krautrock is a post-rock, post-jazz fusion thingy. I put them in the jazz group because their music doesn't fit within the confines of rock.

Lou Reed has always been known to make jazz alongside his rock.

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10char

If I were to put my finger on it:

Tenor sax has this narrow confine between tone and squeal that soloists feel that they must use the squeal as the peak of their riff. Maybe it's cliched or maybe it's simply unpleasant to listen to.

Trumpets can be awesome if they are played softly. But that is not the point of a solo, apparently. That is probably another problem with the tenor sax and the alto sax.

Baritone and bass sax solos can be quite okay. Many of those soloists don't use the cliches of the tenor and alto sax, using the reedy harmonics of the lower notes to really carry their solos.

Trombones rarely get solos and maybe that is a good thing.

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If I were to put my finger on it:

Tenor sax has this narrow confine between tone and squeal that soloists feel that they must use the squeal as the peak of their riff. Maybe it's cliched or maybe it's simply unpleasant to listen to.

Trumpets can be awesome if they are played softly. But that is not the point of a solo, apparently. That is probably another problem with the tenor sax and the alto sax.

Baritone and bass sax solos can be quite okay. Many of those soloists don't use the cliches of the tenor and alto sax, using the reedy harmonics of the lower notes to really carry their solos.

Trombones rarely get solos and maybe that is a good thing.

I think that is over generalizing things. Sure, every instrument has it's own traits which may be considered harsh or annoying, but only "cliche" players will exploit these cliches to a maximum. The best players know when to be melodic and when to turn it up a notch. It's all about what emotion they want to convey.

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I think that is over generalizing things. Sure, every instrument has it's own traits which may be considered harsh or annoying, but only "cliche" players will exploit these cliches to a maximum. The best players know when to be melodic and when to turn it up a notch. It's all about what emotion they want to convey.

Over-generalising? Sure. But it makes it really difficult when trying to find decent works with good solos, especially when the characteristics I listed are so highly desired by jazz fans, apparently.

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Over-generalising? Sure. But it makes it really difficult when trying to find decent works with good solos, especially when the characteristics I listed are so highly desired by jazz fans, apparently.

suppose i can relate to what you mean, an evening at a jazz bar (not that i've spent many) can get tedious when the brass overindulges in one excessive solo after another. Same goes for other instruments to a degree but the forte sound characteristics of e.g. piano or bass are less in your face.

That said, i like all of it in moderate doses. Truth be told i love so many cliches. Orchestra Hits forever!!

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suppose i can relate to what you mean, an evening at a jazz bar (not that i've spent many) can get tedious when the brass overindulges in one excessive solo after another. Same goes for other instruments to a degree but the forte sound characteristics of e.g. piano or bass are less in your face.

That said, i like all of it in moderate doses. Truth be told i love so many cliches. Orchestra Hits forever!!

I can love many cliches, but the unpleasantness of the squeal can make it unbearable. I'd love it if there was a subdued horn craze or strain.

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Haha, classic clip.

Free form jazz has always been a bit of a debated topic. I think you really need to be a jazz musician or at least a musician to appreciate it. Free form jazz is really the "scholarly" genre of jazz. It is much less of a performance as much as it is a presentation on quantum-physics. It's the jazz equivalent to Schoenberg and Webern. Not the greatest to listen to for the average listener, but if you deeply understand the music, it can be a fun experience. That being said, regular jazz that has moments or segments of free form jazz can be very enjoyable.

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If I were to put my finger on it:

Tenor sax has this narrow confine between tone and squeal that soloists feel that they must use the squeal as the peak of their riff. Maybe it's cliched or maybe it's simply unpleasant to listen to.

Trumpets can be awesome if they are played softly. But that is not the point of a solo, apparently. That is probably another problem with the tenor sax and the alto sax.

Baritone and bass sax solos can be quite okay. Many of those soloists don't use the cliches of the tenor and alto sax, using the reedy harmonics of the lower notes to really carry their solos.

Trombones rarely get solos and maybe that is a good thing.

See, the cool thing about horns are their wide timbral spectrum. The variety of tones allows for an incredibly expressive performance; it's why we often have horn leads. Synthesizer leads generally strive for the same kind of effect - heck even guitarists go for a squeal at the peak of their solo.

Not that this text is going to change your mind or anything.

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See, the cool thing about horns are their wide timbral spectrum. The variety of tones allows for an incredibly expressive performance; it's why we often have horn leads. Synthesizer leads generally strive for the same kind of effect - heck even guitarists go for a squeal at the peak of their solo.

Not that this text is going to change your mind or anything.

Well, it isn't about changing my mind. It's about seeking those who are not so hot about horns.

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