Winning900

Guitar settings in FL Studio?

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23 hours ago, timaeus222 said:

By the way, @Winning900, it would be nice if you actually edited your posts by clicking Edit and not post short posts multiple times. It clutters the topic with posts that don't really do much good scattered about. You can also delete past posts by clicking Options -> Delete.

 

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3 hours ago, Winning900 said:

Are expensive VSTs for guitars and orchestrals worth the price? 

Yes, but only if you're willing to spend some quality time with them and get to know how to use it. You'll really want to learn the ins and out of not only the VST, but also the instrument you're trying to emulate. It's also worth noting that there are a lot of good options that won't cost you an arm and a leg but will still sound good. In particular, I'd suggest Shreddage 2 from Impact Soundworks. It's a reasonable $139, covers lead and rhythm guitar and works with the free Kontakt Player. It also sounds "alive", which is an important sound to have when sequencing a guitar.

Orchestral libraries are tricky - There are a ton of excellent VSTs that are cheap, but most of them require the full version of Kontakt 5. Kontakt 5 itself is $399 and comes with a large(30GB or so) library of sounds, including some decent orchestrals. It also opens up a whole world of high quality yet inexpensive plugins. It's probably your best bet. I'd suggest saving up for this above all else for that reason.

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3 hours ago, Winning900 said:

Are expensive VSTs for guitars and orchestrals worth the price?

Short answer - yes - they wouldn't be so expensive if there wasn't a demand. Long answer - expensive VST's won't write good music for you. At the end of the day, orchestral VST's are just collections of recorded instrument sounds. You have to know how to use them and how orchestras, instruments, dynamics, etc, work to get the most out of them.

3 hours ago, Winning900 said:

I am using that thing now instead of guitars, because it looks like I might need one of those expensive ones first.

No, you should learn mixing, and get your arranging solid before you start spending money.

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Honestly I would not even bother with Shreddage.

Somebody stop me if I'm wrong here, but it seems like @Winning900 wants to do mostly rock and metal or at least electric guitar based music? If you go to your local guitar center right now, you can buy a decent guitar for 300-500 bucks that will last you a lifetime if you take good care of it. Couple that with a Line 6 POD or even software amp sims and you're good to go. You don't have to put in years upon years of practice to learn the basics of playing in a metal and rock style either. 

If you don't want to do that, again, just collab with a guitar player - there used to be this joke a drummer I know always told "I'm going to get some slurpees, want me to pick up some guitar players too?"

That money you want to spend on VSTs is not only better used in a time when you have superior composition and mixing skills, it's best spent on instruments that are difficult to obtain like orchestral libraries or backing instruments like drums and bass guitars which are actually more important in getting a good, heavy rock sound than the guitars are.

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On 07/02/2016 at 9:18 PM, AngelCityOutlaw said:

Honestly I would not even bother with Shreddage.

Somebody stop me if I'm wrong here, but it seems like @Winning900 wants to do mostly rock and metal or at least electric guitar based music? If you go to your local guitar center right now, you can buy a decent guitar for 300-500 bucks that will last you a lifetime if you take good care of it. Couple that with a Line 6 POD or even software amp sims and you're good to go. You don't have to put in years upon years of practice to learn the basics of playing in a metal and rock style either. 

If you don't want to do that, again, just collab with a guitar player - there used to be this joke a drummer I know always told "I'm going to get some slurpees, want me to pick up some guitar players too?"

That money you want to spend on VSTs is not only better used in a time when you have superior composition and mixing skills, it's best spent on instruments that are difficult to obtain like orchestral libraries or backing instruments like drums and bass guitars which are actually more important in getting a good, heavy rock sound than the guitars are.

(Laughs at slurpees thanks to an inside joke)

Ok. How do I get my skills better? I just transcribed a piano Megalovania with FL Keys to practice detecting what note each is.

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By the way, the Mario part of this was amazing, what were the instruments/sound effects used in that? The Zelda one was meh and the SSBM one lamer, but the Pokemon one was great, too, what were the instruments used in that? (Besides the 8-bit bass-ish bit I can hear in the background. And I think that's a geesis soundfont thing at 10:20, but I'm not sure. It sounds a lot cooler than my 8-bit soundfont. Also, ranked third is the street fighter one, what instruments were used in that?

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Here. Here's a playlist of videos on synth design. Some of these synths come with FL Studio, some of them don't, so just find some of the videos that have synths that show up in the plugin picker in the FL demo. Watch and follow these videos and you'll get a handle on synth design. 

 

There are so many tutorials out there that you're really wasting your time asking questions on a forum instead of searching YouTube -- if you're serious about this music thing, put in the actual legwork! :)

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1 hour ago, Winning900 said:

I just transcribed a piano Megalovania with FL Keys to practice detecting what note each is.

I think that's really good practice. I tried transcribing Murray Gold's Doctor Who theme when I was starting out. You can also try loading midis of songs you like in your DAW for examination.

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I really like this playlist of "mini-tutorials" for Zebra2; you don't have to have the same synth to get a feel for what each filter or oscillator does. If you listen to what is done in each tutorial, you should be able to analogize back to your synth. (If it's a good synth, it'd better have filters and oscillators.)

Of course, it wouldn't do much good to watch and do nothing else; spend time practicing sound synthesis if you want to get better at sound synthesis. Apparently you want to learn it, but you're asking for stuff you have yet to practice or look into. I highly recommend that you get the fundamentals down, practice that, and work your way up. Some things you ought to know inside and out:

  • What are the common oscillator waveforms? (Square, triangle, sine, saw, noise)
  • What is an oscillator's role in the synth?
  • What are the types of filters? (high pass, low pass, band pass, band reject, etc)
  • What do filters do?

When you develop more complex sounds on your own in a synth, if you remember how you made them, it should make it easier for you to correlate something you hear with the oscillators you can start with, which filters are used, which effects are used, etc. Practice. Even an hour each day is good.

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What is the sound right at the start of this song? It's heard a few other times in the song, but it's right at the start.

 

It's like a bell-ish "Bling!" and a dramatic "Dun!" at the same time.

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In the time it takes you to get good at sequencing fake guitar, you could buy and learn a real guitar, probably for around the same price as you'd drop on expensive VSTs. If you get good on a $100 strat you'll get good on anything. But despite what marketing slogans and marketing people might tell ya, there's no easy path to what you're trying to do. There's the slow uphill path towards your goal, and the larger, sphincter-like stinky path downwards into financial ruin and obviously-fake-sounding-guitar-that-people-wont-enjoy! Not saying people will like your live playing either, at least not for the first year or so, depending on how lazy you are. :) 

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On 26/12/2015 at 7:35 PM, Winning900 said:

Sorry, I meant 1.20. I think that's a piano, but Fruity Loop's built-in pianos don't sound anything like that. How do I get that beautiful sound?

 

It's a preset in guitar rig 5 where the delay/reverb of each note is pitch modulated, I recognize it a mile away.

In metal and djent styles of music guitarists use shimmer effects which is ways of routing delay or reverb into pitch shifting.

 

You will hear the same and similar sounds on this guys youtube demo:

 

The original recording where this came from was on the song balerina 12/24 Vai took an eventide with separate TCE delays so you you would get a duplicated arpeggio.

If you want guitar on your music and for it to sound good then there are people here that can play well and have the required setups.

Sagnewshreds has a good setup for heavier styles of metal and I'm free to record on Sundays myself

 

 

 

Edited by Aster
add info

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8 hours ago, Winning900 said:

Alright, Guitar Rig looks good.

How do I make dubstep? 

You should use whatever out-of-the-box instruments your DAW has, and just start writing music. I don't think tutorials will be a substitute for experience. If you want a synth to work with, try TAL-NoiseMaker, pick some of the preset sounds and see how the knobs changed to make that sound. Eventually, you'll be familiar enough with different sounds that you can identify what is going on in any song you listen to.

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10 hours ago, Winning900 said:

Alright, Guitar Rig looks good.

How do I make dubstep? 

Spend years working on bass design and putting it to use. I'm not kidding.

Being a tad more serious, you should check out zircon's livestreams on making glitch hop music. This one's pretty good.

And I'm going to quote myself (again), because this is really important.

 

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Learn the basics of synthesis and spend a lot of time playing with synthesizers rather than trying to learn "how to make dubstep". You could just buy some preset packs to get that general aesthetic but it won't be as personal and lacking the knowledge of how the stuff works you won't be able to tweak a sound to make it work in a particular track or to personal taste. That and as a newb your production skills and engineering aren't as developed which is equally important, and having a more general knowledge of how this all works makes you more versatile

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27 minutes ago, Winning900 said:

Alright, Guitar Rig looks good.

How do I make dubstep?Guys my post won't post

Your post did indeed post - people responded to it.

Honestly, you're asking questions of which there is no "like this" answer. This stuff takes years of practice to get where you want and a lifetime to master.

1) Study music theory, orchestration, ear-training, composition and arrangement

2) Study production. I.e., mixing, recording, MIDI sequencing, develop an ear for timbre and learn to use every type of music technology you can get your hands on.

3) Use what you learned in the previous categories to critically analyze the music you want to make and utilize the concepts in your own music.

You can "study" all of these by buying books, enrolling in lessons, watching videos, analyzing written scores or MIDI, playing with other musicians and collaborating and just getting out there and making stuff. This is what everyone on this forum giving you advice has been doing for years - often since we were children. There is no easy way.

All of the time you're spending asking us questions is better spent learning from sources dedicated to music education and making music on your own. To paraphrase Blue Stahli "It'll either sound good or light on fire" and you will light some things on fire.

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28 minutes ago, Garpocalypse said:

There really are no secrets to making "good" dubstep.  You just need to buy the right vst that was specifically made for the genre.  I would recommend this one from Slate Digital. 

 

You could take that a step further and turn all these farts into a wavetable for Serum and have TRANSFORMERS FARTING. If you wanna make good dubstep you need next level sound design bro

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As someone who writes slightly "nontraditional" dubstep, I would recommend Serum. Since one can import Massive wavetables into Serum, it is sufficient to use Serum if you want to make patches similar to those you could make in Massive. The factory presets are terrible, but the sound design capacity, especially for bass, is great.

Here's an excerpt from two things I made with Serum (with separate drums, but with other synths removed).

https://app.box.com/s/qg3ydqs69llbnha0r0bqf1z9ki4m244u

Or, if you want an even better demo, check out zircon's Ice Lock. It's got Serum bass written all over it (and wherever Massive was used, Serum could do it as well).

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