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Genres of Music You Do


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So I've gotten rather bored of rock/metal and trance inspired music lately and want to do something else. Problem is, I'm not sure what.

Jazz? Soul? Reggae? Hip Hop? Country? Disco? I dunno.

So how many different styles of music do you compose, remix, play or otherwise participate in? Do you have favourites? If so, what makes that genre(s) a favourite of yours?

What kinds of software, hardware, virtual instrument libraries etc. do you use to create the genres you do and what would you recommend I should do if I want to make the same kind of music you do?

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So I've gotten rather bored of rock/metal and trance inspired music lately and want to do something else. Problem is, I'm not sure what.

Jazz? Soul? Reggae? Hip Hop? Country? Disco? I dunno.

So how many different styles of music do you compose, remix, play or otherwise participate in? Do you have favourites? If so, what makes that genre(s) a favourite of yours?

What kinds of software, hardware, virtual instrument libraries etc. do you use to create the genres you do and what would you recommend I should do if I want to make the same kind of music you do?

Serioulsy? experiment.

I found my own style by making a lot of music. But when I create something or listen to something, what's make the awesomeness is the chaotic part where you have like 2-3 sounds and they are playing hasardously while still being arranged like that. And the other thing I find myself banging at is Slow beats with big bass and High pitch sounds.

For the genre, I usually mix electro, dubstep and drum & bass alltogheter. I use FL studio and the basic plug-in.

If you wanna try something more like your style, try Drum & bass. Guitars are pretty hot in Drum & bass.

Edit:

Example of big bass and high pitch sound:

@ 1:22

Example of chaotic 2-3 sounds arrangement:

@ 1:27
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I started off as a very Eurotrance-esque artist. After that, I moved into drum'n'bass, mostly of the aggressive, bassline-heavy variety. Once I'd gotten a handle on DnB, I switched things up a little bit, and went to atmospheric downtempo/chillout music. The atmosphere in that genre coincided nicely with my trance background, but I added a healthy dose of hip-hop inspired drums and such instead of the more electronic drums in my previous work.

From there, I've kinda evolved into someone who can literally tackle any electronic genre and a few types of hip hop, rock, and even jazz. Everything tends to borrow elements from each other, so by just changing one element at a time in your music, you'll eventually have a really extensive sonic arsenal.

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Cinesynthethnijazz

In other words, I like to draw influence primarily from EDM, Jazz, and Orchestral/Ethnic scores. My music could be one of or any combination of these, really. Sometimes it's other stuff too, but I think these categories really fit the bill for "what kind of musician" I am if you had to classify me.

Currently, Darksiders II is one of my favorite soundtracks. It is synthetic but also has a very exotic, eastern component to its soundscape. This is compared to the first Darksiders soundtrack, which was very classical in nature. I found it a bit boring in comparison to the second.

My tools are FL Studio 10, Komplete 8, and various freeware plug-ins/samples. That's really all I need, anything desired further is just fun toys and higher quality tools. ^.^

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I've found that 95% of all musicians who are asked about genre always answer with "I don't limit myself to genre" or something similar.

Well, I'm going to be a rebel and fully admit I largely only do two genres: Prog (and not prog-rock or prog-metal) and Ambient/Whatever.

This, however, is being worked to remedy. I'm trying to learn dance music and FM chiptune funk.

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I usually just improvise on my keyboard but end up doing Progressive Rock/Metal or just Rock/Metal. I try to add stuff from other genres (like Pop, Jazz, etc) to my songs to make them more unique though.

I don't really use any specific software, besides from Guitar Pro to write the MIDI files. Most samples (piano, pads, strings and leads) come from my keyboard, while I use mostly free stuff for Guitar, Bass and Drums (EZDrummer, the basic pack for this one).

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I usually just improvise on my keyboard but end up doing Progressive Rock/Metal or just Rock/Metal. I try to add stuff from other genres (like Pop, Jazz, etc) to my songs to make them more unique though.

I don't really use any specific software, besides from Guitar Pro to write the MIDI files. Most samples (piano, pads, strings and leads) come from my keyboard, while I use mostly free stuff for Guitar, Bass and Drums (EZDrummer, the basic pack for this one).

Guitar Pro is awesome. I don't like GP6 though, it seems to have so many bugs.

I personally find that writing MIDI as tab and/or notation is more effective than just hitting record in a DAW and recording; I constantly take flak for writing that way, but usually I find it produces better results because I can really study the notation and go about harmonizing it easier than just blocks of MIDI data or live recording.

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Guitar Pro is awesome. I don't like GP6 though, it seems to have so many bugs.

I personally find that writing MIDI as tab and/or notation is more effective than just hitting record in a DAW and recording; I constantly take flak for writing that way, but usually I find it produces better results because I can really study the notation and go about harmonizing it easier than just blocks of MIDI data or live recording.

Yeah, I also find writing MIDI in Guitar Pro effective. Downside is that it's slightly slow. I've been trying to combine recording MIDI in a DAW and then exporting to Guitar Pro, but it's a bit tricky.

I've always wondered how most remixers approach MIDI writing.

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Yeah, I also find writing MIDI in Guitar Pro effective. Downside is that it's slightly slow. I've been trying to combine recording MIDI in a DAW and then exporting to Guitar Pro, but it's a bit tricky.

I've always wondered how most remixers approach MIDI writing.

I pencil it in the piano roll with my mouse; it's the fastest way I can write. That's why I hate everything other than FL Studio, because working in the piano rolls are like, as zircon puts it, "having my mouse dipped in molasses".

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