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Timbaland rips Commodore 64 tune


makke
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I see your point, but do you realize kids are hearing that music and think it's totally original? It reminds me of the time my buddy brought over his kid sister and saw me playing the OG Donkey Kong on NES. She saw me get the hammer and said, "They stole that from Smash Brothers."

I asked him and her to leave.

That's absolutely hilarious.

Almost like saying that the harpsichord is a total rip-off of the piano.

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I see your point, but do you realize kids are hearing that music and think it's totally original? It reminds me of the time my buddy brought over his kid sister and saw me playing the OG Donkey Kong on NES. She saw me get the hammer and said, "They stole that from Smash Brothers."

I asked him and her to leave.

That is beautiful.

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So... tonight, I decided to have a bit of fun. Everytime a popular artist borrows something big, a mashup artist has been there to provide amusement in the form of a mix of the two: I think immediately of PartyBen's Computer Talk (of Coldplay v. Kraftwerk), and Cheekyboy's Tom Petty v. Chili Peppers. I wanted to get in on the action this time, so bam:

neminem - Do Acid (Tempest v. Glenn v. Nelly Furtado)

It's a bit dirty, still, since I obviously didn't have a 'pella or an instrumental to work with, just the originals. Incidentally, just overlaying the chiptune over the Furtado tune didn't sound that great - they're too similar in some ways, but not quite similar enough in other ways, so it just sounded off. What did sound good, though, was overlaying the original tune by tempest over the Furtado tune; then I added a bit more of the chiptune in places.

Oh yeah. Then, while I was already there, I made this, as well:

neminem - Acid Signs (Tempest v. Glenn v. Snoop Dogg).

As you can see, Mustin: I consider what I do to be real music, of a (rather twisted) sort, even though I am perfectly happy to admit that I have no skill at writing anything of my own. What I do differently, though, is state explicitly where everything I stole came from. That's the difference between borrowing and plagiarism.

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So... tonight, I decided to have a bit of fun. Everytime a popular artist borrows something big, a mashup artist has been there to provide amusement in the form of a mix of the two: I think immediately of PartyBen's Computer Talk (of Coldplay v. Kraftwerk), and Cheekyboy's Tom Petty v. Chili Peppers. I wanted to get in on the action this time, so bam:

neminem - Do Acid (Tempest v. Glenn v. Nelly Furtado)

It's a bit dirty, still, since I obviously didn't have a 'pella or an instrumental to work with, just the originals. Incidentally, just overlaying the chiptune over the Furtado tune didn't sound that great - they're too similar in some ways, but not quite similar enough in other ways, so it just sounded off. What did sound good, though, was overlaying the original tune by tempest over the Furtado tune; then I added a bit more of the chiptune in places.

Oh yeah. Then, while I was already there, I made this, as well:

neminem - Acid Signs (Tempest v. Glenn v. Snoop Dogg).

As you can see, Mustin: I consider what I do to be real music, of a (rather twisted) sort, even though I am perfectly happy to admit that I have no skill at writing anything of my own. What I do differently, though, is state explicitly where everything I stole came from. That's the difference between borrowing and plagiarism.

It helps that using parody puts your work under Fair Use.

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Not necessarily. You're still taking a copyrighted work and using it for your own purpose and then giving it away, which infringes on that copyright. A parody is Space Balls to Star Wars. They didn't actually use any of the Star Wars names, any of the same ships, actual Lightsabers - anything from the actual movie. That's a parody. What Weird Al does isn't a parody - he actually has to license the masters from the publishers and the record companies and then puts his own spin on it.

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Not necessarily. You're still taking a copyrighted work and using it for your own purpose and then giving it away, which infringes on that copyright. A parody is Space Balls to Star Wars. They didn't actually use any of the Star Wars names, any of the same ships, actual Lightsabers - anything from the actual movie. That's a parody. What Weird Al does isn't a parody - he actually has to license the masters from the publishers and the record companies and then puts his own spin on it.

Yeah. Of course, Weird Al still might be able to argue fair use even if he *didn't* ask but it would be a legal headache that I'm sure he would rather not bother with.

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Not necessarily. You're still taking a copyrighted work and using it for your own purpose and then giving it away, which infringes on that copyright. A parody is Space Balls to Star Wars. They didn't actually use any of the Star Wars names, any of the same ships, actual Lightsabers - anything from the actual movie. That's a parody. What Weird Al does isn't a parody - he actually has to license the masters from the publishers and the record companies and then puts his own spin on it.

Not really

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wierd_Al#Reactions_from_original_artists

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Yeah, he's a pimp like that.

If by "pimp", we mean "person who parodies", then yes.

Your post just makes it sound like he has some sort of special privilege, when in reality, anyone is protected by fair use as long as they sample for a parody or for historic/editorial purposes.

Sorry, just wanted to clarify.

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Not exactly. Fair Use law is NOT all encompassing. It's determined on a case by case basis. Unlike laws about, say, sampling (ALWAYS illegal w/o permission, no matter how unrecognizable or how short) Fair Use is much more nebulous.

I understand that, and the worst part is that the case rulings are so huge in number and often contradictory... I'm not a law major, and even if I was, I'm not sure it would make sense to me.

BTW, though, I really like Gecko's YTMND because it gives good evidence that they are the same thing - the C64 version used arpeggios because of technical limitations (correct me if that's not right), and those still exist in the ringtone and "Do It".

Good call Gecko, hope this gets out there.

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