Jump to content

Single-Synth Remixes


prophetik music
 Share

Recommended Posts

has anyone ever done anything like this? i've been getting into single-synth remixing a lot lately because it forces me to get creative and not just do everything in a rut. using just one synthesizer and completely exploring the tonal capabilities of it have really expanded my flexibility, i think. it's pretty fun.

i've done tracks using NI's Massive and Absynth, Rob Papen's Blue, and i'm thinking about digging into Omnisphere some this time around for my next one.

anyone else ever did anything like this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always wanted to try this. It would be quite a challenge.

I'm thinking about starting up LDJ in Visual Boy Advance and recording some stuff. Or maybe try something with Logic's ES1 or ESP synth. Maybe even get crazy and go the Sega Genesis route and use the EFM1.

You could even get really creative and load a single sample into a sampler and use that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, single-sample stuff is very tricky.. I've heard it done and it's just crazy, especially when you work in processing and granular synthesis. Single-synth isn't impressive if it's a ROMpler/sampler BUT if you're talking about just a simple subtractive or additive synth, that can be cool. For example, doing a whole track with just Synth1 or even Zebra 2 would be very impressive, since you have to synthesize all your percussion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Uh, a lot of people do things like this? That's why they make keyboards with sequencers?

The tough thing is like that Cerrax said - load in a single sample and use just THAT to make a track.

Ask Mazedude about that.

no, you're not understanding what i'm talking about. not a hardware synth, like a keyboard or something. a software synth, reason's Maelstrom or FL's Sytrus. ok, sytrus would be easier than maelstrom, but you get the picture. the whole point is doing everything - drums, bass, pads, everything - using different instances of the same synth.

edit: yeah, zircon, that's what i'm talking about. like Blue v1.01, for example - that kind of stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For example, doing a whole track with just Synth1 or even Zebra 2 would be very impressive, since you have to synthesize all your percussion.

Tricky stuff, man. I attempted to do that once, I didn't like it. Mainly because I'm way too lazy.

DRUM SAMPLES FOR LIFE!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love single-synth music - it really pushes the limits of what you can do on something musically. Chiptune writing (real chiptune writing, not the sound-alikes) is close to this, although you've got four channels to work with...

It's always fun doing things like that - it pushes your skills as a composer, for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, Kayoti's stuff is pretty inspiring.

I tried to synthesize acoustic sounding stuff in synth1 a bit after I'd found his work. I imagine it takes a good while to get to his level of knowledge about something like synth1. I didn't get anything very realistic sounding, but still got some fun patches out of it.

This one's 100% synth1 for example.

http://tindeck.com/listen/xkso

Shame I didn't know how to do a proper Orchestral sounding snare back then. Kayoti explained to me how to do a pretty convincing one. Part of the secret is using synth1's fx section and eq as a solid part of the synth instead of just adding sprinkles on top of the raw sound.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

has anyone ever done anything like this?

Tons of music has been made this way. One of the most successful "classical music" albums was done this way, back in the late 60s, Switched-On Bach.

If you're interested in this sort of thing check out Isao Tomita's stuff from the 70s, like Holst's Planets suite recorded from effectively a single synth.

Mazedude has a single sine wave mix on the FF4 project that is excellent.

Stockhausen did that back in the 50s. Well, minus the FF4.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bustatunez sent me this a while ago; the artist used 100% Synth1 for the track. Very impressive.

www.audixmusic.com/Kaiyoti_-_Army_of_Synth1.mp3

Haha yes, this is an EXCELLENT example of excellent "one synth" (Synth1 lololol) music.

To be fair, analoq, stuff like "Switched on Bach" was basically just playing back classical music on synthesizers with no attempt at emulating the tone of particular instruments accurately. While I appreciate that music (my Dad has it on vinyl) and while I can appreciate the experimentation of composers like Stockhausen, the latter's works are so mind-numbingly unpleasant to listen to, I find things like "Army of Synth1" much more interesting. The composition isn't outstanding from an academic perspective, perhaps, but the synthesis involved is far superior.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be fair, analoq, stuff like "Switched on Bach" was basically just playing back classical music on synthesizers with no attempt at emulating the tone of particular instruments accurately.

If you want imitative synthesis, check out Tomita. The great thing about Switched-On Bach was that instead of having flimsy imitations of acoustic instruments, it reproduced works by Bach with new sounds. That's far more interesting, in my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At the time, sure, but it's interesting now mainly as a historic work... since anyone can do it with a MIDI and free VSTs. Kind of like how we can look back on the printing press and admire the genius that went into inventing it, but you wouldn't use a 15th century printing press for any modern purposes. Likewise I don't find that more interesting to listen to now than advanced synthesis techniques of composers today. Also, I haven't heard that much Tomita but from what has been sent to me, it's a bit dull. A lot of it is obviously 'synthy' and not imitative. Again, just check out that Army of Synth1 thing. I've NEVER heard anyone do that with subtractive synthesis - it's absolutely nuts, pure skill of the highest order. I simply can't believe that was done with sines, triangles, saws, squares, and noise in a simple Nord Lead emulator.

There's also this, an excerpt of a Beethoven symphony played through custom MinimoogV patches (no samples, of course.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At the time, sure, but it's interesting now mainly as a historic work... since anyone can make a shit imitation of Switched-On Bach with a MIDI and free VSTs.

Fixed that for you. The skilled performance and sound design of Switched-On Bach is beyond what any amateur is capable of. Even if you took away the synth, it is still a good Bach performance.

Again, just check out that Army of Synth1 thing. I've NEVER heard anyone do that with subtractive synthesis - it's absolutely nuts, pure skill of the highest order.

You obviously haven't heard much of Tomita's stuff if you think this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...