Jump to content

Virginia Tech Shooting


!Nekko!
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 259
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I honestly do not believe those that have the intelligence to get into college would actually believe that since one person of a certain country did an action that all of the same said country would do the same.

Plus, as stated, the motive was emotional relations problems, so if anything, people should be afraid of those that have had recent break ups or are emotionally traumatized by relation problems.

That being said, you all should be very afraid of me. Sounds stupid, right? So does one blaiming a country for one's stupid actions.

I hope you know I'm agreeing wtith everything you are saying. I'm just stating what might happen. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope you know I'm agreeing wtith everything you are saying. I'm just stating what might happen. ;)

What might happen? What WILL happen. There is always going to be some narrow-minded asshole that starts trouble, and he or she will convince others to think the same way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding the state of the killer's mind: I'm guessing 'not well'. Some talk of a 2 hour cooling off period which proves he was sane and rational. On the other hand, we have the time line...

Act 1: finds, and kills, ex-girlfriend.

Act 2: 2 hours pass.

Act 3: goes around school, trying to find the ex-girlfriend, shooting anyone that can't help him.

If he was sane, thinking straight, and acting in cold blood, why would he be trying to find his girlfriend?

You got it all wrong. Because apparently, the shooter was mentally troubled YEARS before the shooting happened and one can say that his activity over the last few years were far from sane according to accounts of fellow campus mates and teachers.

Also, they say he never had a friend, no less a girlfriend since he's such a recluse and mentally troubled.

And you know why he was trying to find his girlfriend? Because he was obviously deluded and insane. NOT because he was sane.

Regarding the ensuing political debates: This massacre won't change the gun laws of the USA. Every right has its responsibility, every freedom has its cost. The cost of the freedom of gun ownership is incidents such as these, and the American citizenry has always been willing to accept that cost for their freedom.

Not really. The whole idea of liberating guns from gunlaws is so that these things could be DETERRED entirely. If such propagation of guns leads to more violence like these, it'd be nigh certainty that guns could be led to a total ban, at least in the political front of things.

I'm not too concerned about the banning of guns. I'm fortunate enough not to live in the USA, nor in any war-torn area, so the chances of me being gunned down are remarkably slim.

The state of crimes in the US isn't as half bad as you may assume it is, beyond the sensationalism.

My only point was that there will be many people trying to use this to fuel their arguments for strict gun control in the USA, but that ultimately these arguments will be ignored. The USA loves its guns, and would not allow its government to have them taken away. The USA loves its guns, and though it knows that the price of such gun laws is thousands of firearms fatalities every year, it, will not allow the government to take those firearms away. Cultural climates are aptly named - they are long-term patterns that take time to move in, and time to move out. Isolated incidents such as these, as shocking as they are, are isolated, and the effect quickly wears off.

As far as school safety issues go, no. They are not 'isolated' and the effect never really wears off entirely. After all these years, highschools still are coming to grips with Columbine and now with this shooting, colleges will try to tighten the security situation better. Also, this issue strikes me more as a mental illness prevention/intervention thing than gun control. Because as far as guns on campuses go, I really don't see anyone, even gun lovers advocating for them being on school grounds where their children live. Also, just because people feel the need to carry around firearms, it doesn't automatically make them into 'gun lovers'. I wonder where your fantasyland version of America comes from.

In the grand scheme of things, I find it nigh despicable that the gun lobbyists jumped at this issue like sharks on blood. It hasn't been more than days of the incident and they go on a preemptive strike with the whole 'propagate guns!' rhetoric. Just as much we don't know what would have happened if police and school faculty acted quicker during the shooting, we don't know for certain that more guns on campus would have led to vigilante action. I find it absolutely sickening that gun lobbyists are seeing this as a political chance and they look at this issue with a sneer of 'I told you so'. Really, as far as school shootings go, I think gun laws are a non issue. It's more of a specialized security issue as far as faculties of schools themselves goes and not as a societal issue as a whole.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not the two hour gap he was talking about. He was refering to the two hour period between the West AJ Murders and the Norris Hall Massacre. Why the killer waited two hours before returning to campus and slaughtering the engineers. Especially the reports that he was asking about his girlfriend in Norris, when it seems his girlfriend was the first one he killed, more then two hours earlier. That points to the killer simply being batshit insane.

The standard response of a person who just finished off a murder and evaded the initial police sweep is that they go to ground for a few days. Try to hide, before either fleeing or killing their next victim. Serial Killers rarely use guns in a public area, so signs pointed to a run of the mill murder. They didn't account for the insanity factor.

Guys, I think we need to establish that the first girl was not his ex-gf.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Disgusting... And something that could have been prevented VERY easily. I blame the parents (what an original stance...) for this. They couldn't have not known their son was a god damn psycho. Look at all the evidence! Yet still, they send him to such a huge school to live by himself? Are you kidding? That boy should have been detained, or at the very least he should have been forced to live at home and go to a school closer by, so that he could be supervised. But nooooo, for whatever reason, they still send someone who was clearly not right in the head to school. Gun laws, video games, the media, the school, the police, the government, the Palestinian guy with a cellphone camera, absolutely none of that has to do with this. It's completely because of the parents, and they should be locked up for neglect of a kid who should have been treated like a five-year-old.

My condolences go out to anyone who has lost a friend or family member from this tragedy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Disgusting... And something that could have been prevented VERY easily. I blame the parents (what an original stance...) for this. They couldn't have not known their son was a god damn psycho. Look at all the evidence! Yet still, they send him to such a huge school to live by himself? Are you kidding? That boy should have been detained, or at the very least he should have been forced to live at home and go to a school closer by, so that he could be supervised. But nooooo, for whatever reason, they still send someone who was clearly not right in the head to school. Gun laws, video games, the media, the school, the police, the government, the Palestinian guy with a cellphone camera, absolutely none of that has to do with this. It's completely because of the parents, and they should be locked up for neglect of a kid who should have been treated like a five-year-old.

My condolences go out to anyone who has lost a friend or family member from this tragedy.

It's questionable weather or not the parents are responsible for such deep rooted mental instability. Mr. Cho was 23 years old, an age where his parents were no longer responsible for him. He didn't kill anyone when they were his legal guardians, and he went to an in-state school, so it wasn't like they sent him across the country. This was Cho Seung-Hui's fault, no one elses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding the ensuing political debates: This massacre won't change the gun laws of the USA. Every right has its responsibility, every freedom has its cost. The cost of the freedom of gun ownership is incidents such as these, and the American citizenry has always been willing to accept that cost for their freedom.

Yeah, I doubt it'll have much of an effect on gun control laws, but we'll see.

My aikido sensei was speaking with another student earlier about this tragedy, and was theorizing this sort of thing might be easier to avoid in the future, saying it has been projected that not too far off up to 3/4 of the (at least male) population will have seen active duty and expects that more people will be likely to stand up. He, like several of the students he trains, did his time in the service and has seen live combat, so he understands that while the average civilian may not be up to it people who have seen active duty become densenitized so the aprehension doesn't keep him/her from doing what he/she feels needs to be done. I'm not really going anywhere with this, and while it's most certainly easier said than done, but the whole of my adult life I've personally resolved to intervene. The few times I've deemed it necessary, I've been successful in defusing potentially dangerous/violent situations (I'm pretty intimidating, I've been told) but I've not needed to go into an already dangerous/violent situation. Anyway, I train so I don't have to use it (those who understand that need no further explanation). Well, at any rate, while I know that these situations will inevitably happen, I sincerely hope and pray that it can somehow be avoided or resolved more quickly in the future. I also just recently learned a friend of a friend transferred there this year for engineering...haven't heard whether he is among the casualties or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's questionable weather or not the parents are responsible for such deep rooted mental instability. Mr. Cho was 23 years old, an age where his parents were no longer responsible for him. He didn't kill anyone when they were his legal guardians, and he went to an in-state school, so it wasn't like they sent him across the country. This was Cho Seung-Hui's fault, no one elses.

I'm not saying that his parents were the cause of his instability. However, it apparently was known that he was not... "right" in the head. I'm sure his parents knew it. It's not as if they couldn't have done anything to prevent this. Therapy stands out in my mind. Also, I'm sure that if a person is deemed a danger to themselves or others, a certain power over this person can be exerted.

I will agree that ultimately it is his fault and his fault alone (though looking back at my comment, I suppose it's pretty easy to interpret otherwise, sorry). I'm simply saying that it was preventable, had his parents been paying attention and taken care of this instability immediately, rather than let this man go out left to his own devices. That's all. It's bothersome that dangerously unstable people are being left to do as they please, especially when it results in 32 deaths of innocent students.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My next door neighbor was talking to my Mom about this. She said her daughter in law works at the school cleaning the dorms. She was 20 minutes late to work that day, and the dorm she had to clean was the one where the first killings happened.

thats crazy man. one of my cousins worked at the world trade center and was late to work on 9/11.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not saying that his parents were the cause of his instability. However, it apparently was known that he was not... "right" in the head. I'm sure his parents knew it. It's not as if they couldn't have done anything to prevent this. Therapy stands out in my mind. Also, I'm sure that if a person is deemed a danger to themselves or others, a certain power over this person can be exerted.

I will agree that ultimately it is his fault and his fault alone (though looking back at my comment, I suppose it's pretty easy to interpret otherwise, sorry). I'm simply saying that it was preventable, had his parents been paying attention and taken care of this instability immediately, rather than let this man go out left to his own devices. That's all. It's bothersome that dangerously unstable people are being left to do as they please, especially when it results in 32 deaths of innocent students.

What if his parents did pay attention and tried to help him out the best they could? Can you still blame them for the actions Cho took?

Right now i feel sorry for his family as well as the victims familys. His family too suffered a great loss and probably will face alot of problems for the rest of thier life because of their son's actions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow. I just saw bits of the videos this guy theoretically made between the shootings on Fox News. He was definitely fucked in the head, ranting and raving like a nut job to a camera he held. Couple that with the court ruling from 2005 calling him a danger to people around him, and now you have to wonder... why was this guy allowed to continue walking around free? Sounds like he needed to be in a rubber room a long time ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow. I just saw bits of the videos this guy theoretically made between the shootings on Fox News. He was definitely fucked in the head, ranting and raving like a nut job to a camera he held. Couple that with the court ruling from 2005 calling him a danger to people around him, and now you have to wonder... why was this guy allowed to continue walking around free? Sounds like he needed to be in a rubber room a long time ago.

http://video.msn.com/v/us/v.htm?g=925BC281-CE20-439E-9682-8CC58066B2BF&t=c3557&f=06/64&p=hotvideo_m_vatech&fg=&GT1=9246

yeah, he was fucked up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To use this product, you need to install free software

This product requires Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 with Microsoft Media Player 10 and Macromedia Flash 6, or Mozilla Firefox 1.5 with Macromedia Flash 8, or Safari 2.0.4 with Macromedia Flash 8. To download these free software applications, click the links below and follow the on-screen instructions.

Step 1: download firefox 1.5

download firefox 1.5

Step 2: Download Macromedia Flash Player

Macromedia Flash player is free to download

Once the installations are complete, reload this page.

Why does it tell me to get stuff I already have? :\ lol Any other sites?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To use this product, you need to install free software

This product requires Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 with Microsoft Media Player 10 and Macromedia Flash 6, or Mozilla Firefox 1.5 with Macromedia Flash 8, or Safari 2.0.4 with Macromedia Flash 8. To download these free software applications, click the links below and follow the on-screen instructions.

Step 1: download firefox 1.5

download firefox 1.5

Step 2: Download Macromedia Flash Player

Macromedia Flash player is free to download

Once the installations are complete, reload this page.

Why does it tell me to get stuff I already have? :\ lol Any other sites?

Apparently NBC was the only station mailed a copy, you're best bet would be to try youtube.

Here's the summery

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18169776/?GT1=9246

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thing is, its gonna happen. A lot of students are going to see an asian student and think "Oh no, are they going to shoot me?" Which sickens me to say the least......I hoping that maybe I'm wrong though.

Maybe for a brief period...

But as big as this incident is, I wouldn't necessarily expect a significant increase in racial tension because of it.

Remember the DC snipers? When the killers were discovered to be black, people were shocked, having expected the killer(s) to be white.

Despite this initial shock, people didn't seem to really adopt a new stereotype of blacks being potential serial-killers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a fun fact, South Koreans are now responsible for the deadliest civilian shooting in the US, and the deadliest civilian shooting worldwide.

I don't like how you worded that sentence at all. I know this probably isn't your intention, but you make it sound as if the South Korean government sent a trained killer to America in order to do this. He was a troubled college student who happened to be Korean-American (he had been living in America for quite some time before the incidents, so I assume he was a naturalized citizen.) To me, the fact that he is Korean has little do with any of this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a fun fact, South Koreans are now responsible for the deadliest civilian shooting in the US, and the deadliest civilian shooting worldwide.
I don't like how you worded that sentence at all. I know this probably isn't your intention, but you make it sound as if the South Korean government sent a trained killer to America in order to do this. He was a troubled college student who happened to be Korean-American (he had been living in America for quite some time before the incidents, so I assume he was a naturalized citizen.) To me, the fact that he is Korean has little do with any of this.

yeah, that statement is pretty much the most wrong thing you can say at this point, concerning asians (which, as said, shouldn't have any bearing on the matter). but i'm pretty sure there are way more other korean and korean american students out there that are fearful of anyone that actually thinks the way DragonFireKai is right now.

i do recall the s. korean president expressing his country's sorrow and schock and offering condolences, which could almost be taken like an apology for cho's actions. not a good look for them right now. but don't get it twisted, they're not responsible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...