Jump to content


Photo

What you don't like about music


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#1 AngelCityOutlaw

AngelCityOutlaw

    Dr. Robotnik (+2700)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,704 posts
  • LocationAlberta, Canada

Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:24 PM

Let me elaborate further

"What don't you like about making music and what do you think you aren't very good at."

Is there any step in the music makin' process you just flat out hate? Something you find boring, tedious or frustrating? Also, is there something other people think you're good at, but you think you suck at?

I'm just curious to know your thoughts. I hate recording and I'm fairly shit at guitar. That's my thing.

#2 Meteo Xavier

Meteo Xavier

    Songs of Light and Darkness Asst. Director, Impulse Composer

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,698 posts

Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:33 PM

My biggest hate?

Trying to decide if this track I did would sound good to the listener or not.

#3 Modus

Modus

    Strider Hiryu (+2100)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,174 posts
  • LocationOhio

Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:46 PM

I'm not good at recreating soundscapes that are in my head. I don't like dealing with equalization or balancing out a track.

Kind of a negative thread. Maybe we should add something we think we're good at.. like how I.. uhhhh.. sometimes make tracks longer than 3 minutes?

#4 ectogemia

ectogemia

    Raccoon Mario (+1950)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,956 posts
  • LocationIndianapolis. IN

Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:05 PM

Balance and instrumentation. I have a smallish set of instruments that I've become comfortable with, and I struggle to realize the ideas in my head when I venture beyond them. On the flip side, when I experiment with new sounds, I always produce my best tunes.

Level balance, though, is a battle I'll just never win :/

#5 Moseph

Moseph

    Strider Hiryu (+2100)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,177 posts
  • LocationSaint Louis, MO

Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:35 PM

Wrestling with freaking Sonar and its borked automation curves.
Posted Image

#6 Garpocalypse

Garpocalypse

    Kirby (+1500)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,684 posts

Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:46 PM

I tend to get a pretty massive block right after I get the meat of the idea out of my head or once I complete a section I thought was perfect for what I was going for.

But to better answer your question i think I hate rewriting the most. Which is something I have been doing alot over the past few weeks. Trying to get older projects listenable but not quite getting there since i tend to delete everything that's new within 15 minutes...

You know what I also really hate?! Having a great idea for the perfect remix, then after working on it for 20 min. realizing that i can't get the tone/sound/instrument etc. that I need to make it all work! Then I trash it, throw my monitors at my neighbors dog, then cry myself to sleep. This is proving to be an expensive hobby/lifestyle.

#7 Chimpazilla

Chimpazilla

    Judge

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,776 posts
  • LocationPhoenix, AZ

Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:59 PM

What I think I'm ok at: arrangement, chord progressions, writing in general, drums

What I think I suck at: levels, balancing low end, picking good instrumentation (primarily, getting good lead sounds), mixing/getting room for things in the mix

What I'm improving at: effects - learning what they are, and how/when to use them

What I think I'm GREAT at: well, nothing, yet!

A wise friend said "we are all works in progress."

(wise friend, you know who you are)

#8 Swifthom

Swifthom

    Meat Boy (+250)

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 273 posts
  • LocationUnited Kingdom

Posted 13 April 2012 - 12:15 AM

What I'm bad at: Lead instruments and melodies...
I can arrange notes but getting my lead instrument to sound 1) good and 2) soulfull is just beyond me. I'm a percussionist, I like noises... I get chords - their just an advancement of the rhythm, but actual melody...

Bah :tomatoface:

What I'm good at: Cooking myself the kind of feel good meal that makes it all better :-D

#9 Garpocalypse

Garpocalypse

    Kirby (+1500)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,684 posts

Posted 13 April 2012 - 03:47 AM

What I'm bad at: Lead instruments and melodies...
I can arrange notes but getting my lead instrument to sound 1) good and 2) soulfull is just beyond me. I'm a percussionist, I like noises... I get chords - their just an advancement of the rhythm, but actual melody...

Bah :tomatoface:

What I'm good at: Cooking myself the kind of feel good meal that makes it all better :-D



I'm not much of a percussionist but the key difference is shaping the note while it's being played. I assisted teaching a bass methods class in college and I always thought it was funny that when I was helping a percussionist play something melodic he/she would hit the note then move on immediately. To get more expression, try imagining an image or event that the music seems to describe to you and think of that while you play.

#10 dannthr

dannthr

    Chun-Li (+1000)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,066 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA

Posted 14 April 2012 - 05:11 PM

Excellent, an emo bitchfest thread. :)

One of the things I remind my students often about composing music is this:

Composing music or more specifically, mastering music composition is a life-long pursuit.

Acknowledging that point of fact is really important in engaging the learning process and maintaining a positive and constructive outlook throughout the journey that is mastering music composition.


What don't I like about making music?

The impediments and obstacles I face in the music making process are usually related to what I feel are the limitations of my tools and the legwork required to wrestle with those tools to get the product I imagine.

What do I think I am not very good at?

My foils are related to discipline. I am not very good at maintaining focus and discipline in general, this is not unique to music making, but is a problem I have with every aspect of my life.

(In order to remedy this, I need to balance discipline appropriately with a playful creative outlet, but it's not something that happens over night, it requires a lot of hard work.)

Is there a specific step in the music making process I flat out hate?

I really dislike instrument programming. It's like going to the dentist, it's good to go, you have to do it, but it's painful almost the entire way through.

Boring, tedious, or frustrating?

Along with instrument programming, I would have to say mixing. I'm never happy with my mixes. And if I ever find myself happy with my mixes, it never lasts.

I would also like to add that I am constantly frustrated with what I feel is a lack of harmonic diversity in my music making. At some point mastering conventional harmony is boring and you feel the need to push outside of the box more and more.

But music composition, as a life-long journey, does have its breakthroughs, it's moments of revelation. Much like Chess or Go, a beginning player wouldn't understand the movements of an advanced player, but then you have these breakthrough moments that free you from the box, but then you realize that you have to meet that breakthrough with an advancement in your skill because that box you broke through was providing structure.

The most important and embarrassing music revelation I had was last year when I realized that key signatures were meaningless and I have been struggling to advance my skill level to meet that revelation. Sometimes it's quite frustrating.

I'm also struggling with a completely satisfying control over orchestral timbre through orchestration and instrumentation.

Something other people think I'm good at that I suck at?

Music composition, orchestration, and production.

Often times we look at someone on top of a hill, and see them as being at the summit, but from our angle, we can't see the mountain behind them--they can--in hiking we call this a false summit.

There is still so much more to learn, so much more mountain to climb, and yeah, it can be exhausting, and it can be frustrating when you look over and someone younger than you is higher up that mountain, or someone who used to be behind you is ahead, but you gotta focus on your climbing at all times.

There is no final summit, they are all false summits, it's the climbing that's the point of the journey.
- Dan Reynolds
Composer/Sound Designer/Implementor
MUSICIANEER
Posted Image

#11 liquid wind

liquid wind

    Bad Dude (+400)

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 439 posts

Posted 14 April 2012 - 05:22 PM

I dislike a lot of the mundane things that aren't actually composition, for instance I recently converted all of my .sf2's and .dwp's to .xrni, or just going through samples in general. you can download thousands and thousands of sounds these days but it's also kind of a distraction when you have to decide which are worth using


#12 Xenon Odyssey

Xenon Odyssey

    Kirby (+1500)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,657 posts
  • LocationForest Hill Zone

Posted 14 April 2012 - 05:38 PM

Excellent, an emo bitchfest thread. :)

One of the things I remind my students often about composing music is this:

Composing music or more specifically, mastering music composition is a life-long pursuit.

Acknowledging that point of fact is really important in engaging the learning process and maintaining a positive and constructive outlook throughout the journey that is mastering music composition.


What don't I like about making music?

The impediments and obstacles I face in the music making process are usually related to what I feel are the limitations of my tools and the legwork required to wrestle with those tools to get the product I imagine.

What do I think I am not very good at?

My foils are related to discipline. I am not very good at maintaining focus and discipline in general, this is not unique to music making, but is a problem I have with every aspect of my life.

(In order to remedy this, I need to balance discipline appropriately with a playful creative outlet, but it's not something that happens over night, it requires a lot of hard work.)

Is there a specific step in the music making process I flat out hate?

I really dislike instrument programming. It's like going to the dentist, it's good to go, you have to do it, but it's painful almost the entire way through.

Boring, tedious, or frustrating?

Along with instrument programming, I would have to say mixing. I'm never happy with my mixes. And if I ever find myself happy with my mixes, it never lasts.

I would also like to add that I am constantly frustrated with what I feel is a lack of harmonic diversity in my music making. At some point mastering conventional harmony is boring and you feel the need to push outside of the box more and more.

But music composition, as a life-long journey, does have its breakthroughs, it's moments of revelation. Much like Chess or Go, a beginning player wouldn't understand the movements of an advanced player, but then you have these breakthrough moments that free you from the box, but then you realize that you have to meet that breakthrough with an advancement in your skill because that box you broke through was providing structure.

The most important and embarrassing music revelation I had was last year when I realized that key signatures were meaningless and I have been struggling to advance my skill level to meet that revelation. Sometimes it's quite frustrating.

I'm also struggling with a completely satisfying control over orchestral timbre through orchestration and instrumentation.

Something other people think I'm good at that I suck at?

Music composition, orchestration, and production.

Often times we look at someone on top of a hill, and see them as being at the summit, but from our angle, we can't see the mountain behind them--they can--in hiking we call this a false summit.

There is still so much more to learn, so much more mountain to climb, and yeah, it can be exhausting, and it can be frustrating when you look over and someone younger than you is higher up that mountain, or someone who used to be behind you is ahead, but you gotta focus on your climbing at all times.

There is no final summit, they are all false summits, it's the climbing that's the point of the journey.


As a composer that hasn't done jack-all since I graduated last year, this speaks to me deeply.

#13 Dj Mokram

Dj Mokram

    Be Aggressive! Co-Director

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,497 posts
  • LocationVR Training

Posted 14 April 2012 - 06:30 PM

@dannthr: sir, you've worded this better than I ever could (at my modest level of course).

Composing melodies is what gives (gave) me the most enjoyment. Mixing/nitpicking, not so much.
Many ideas and inspiration were lost to me in the quest of improving production values.
Balancing all these elements while keeping sight of the objective is truly a daunting task.

Everyone pretty much has their own journey to experience and summits to climb.
There's always gonna be someone who can do better in less time and with less effort.
The most important/hardest thing imho is to avoid getting discouraged and loose your passion.

Under-remixed VGM Defender ||| Twitter - Soundcloud


#14 zircon

zircon

    Balance and Ruin Director, Voices of the Lifestream Director

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,947 posts
  • LocationBaltimore

Posted 14 April 2012 - 06:57 PM

I hate writer's block. I almost never have a full plan for a piece in my head. Most of my composition comes 100% from improvisation, not realizing ideas in my head.
Original albums, tutorials, videos, free music at zirconMusic

Kontakt samples for composers & remixers: Impact Soundworks

My music gear recommendations for $99 or less!

twitter | facebook | youtube

#15 ectogemia

ectogemia

    Raccoon Mario (+1950)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,956 posts
  • LocationIndianapolis. IN

Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:02 PM

I hate writer's block. I almost never have a full plan for a piece in my head. Most of my composition comes 100% from improvisation, not realizing ideas in my head.


Hah, weird. I do the same thing. I usually come up with a seed idea, flesh out a phrase of music completely with percussion, pads, melody, harmony, etc., then build ad lib on either side of it.

Because I'm a creepy-ass stalker, I thought I remembered reading somewhere that you said you create most of your pieces sequentially; beginning to end. Do you really just kinda wing it all straight from nothing and develop a piece from the intro to the outro all by improv? I can't even imagine doing that... that's pretty impressive. Intros are usually how I finish writing a tune :P

#16 zircon

zircon

    Balance and Ruin Director, Voices of the Lifestream Director

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,947 posts
  • LocationBaltimore

Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:15 PM

Yep, that's what I do about 98% of the time.
Original albums, tutorials, videos, free music at zirconMusic

Kontakt samples for composers & remixers: Impact Soundworks

My music gear recommendations for $99 or less!

twitter | facebook | youtube

#17 AngelCityOutlaw

AngelCityOutlaw

    Dr. Robotnik (+2700)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,704 posts
  • LocationAlberta, Canada

Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:19 PM

Interesting. I like to try my best to realize the songs in my head. I've tried just jammin' to find something that I like and use it, but rarely can I write a full song that way. At least, I can rarely write a song I like that way.

I like the challenge of being able to transcribe the songs I imagine and hear in my head. It's an awesome feeling when you have this great melody or riff in your mind and then you hear it for real. Helps with learning other songs by ear too.

#18 zircon

zircon

    Balance and Ruin Director, Voices of the Lifestream Director

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,947 posts
  • LocationBaltimore

Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:28 PM

If I do have an idea, transcribing it is pretty easy. After studying theory/ear training I can do that fairly readily. But I believe ideas are actually very hard to come by, and you sort of either have them or you don't.
Original albums, tutorials, videos, free music at zirconMusic

Kontakt samples for composers & remixers: Impact Soundworks

My music gear recommendations for $99 or less!

twitter | facebook | youtube

#19 Yoozer

Yoozer

    Kirby (+1500)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,684 posts
  • LocationAntarctica

Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:36 PM

Kind of a negative thread


No sadness, no joy.

What don't you like about making music

Hm. If I'm being honest, there's nothing I don't like. Granted, I haven't had the experience yet to deal with a band with an ego or an untalented singer insisting that their recording that sounds like a burlap sack of rats on fire can be autotuned to something palatable, so perhaps that would sway my opinion.

I think most of the stuff is not about not liking it - it's frustration at me being not good enough.

and what do you think you aren't very good at.

I wish I was more proficient with chord progressions, though wishing is useless; practice and studying theory would be useful. I'm also not very good at resisting the siren's call of forums ;-)

Is there any step in the music makin' process you just flat out hate?


Nope.

Something you find boring, tedious or frustrating?

There is lots of boring and tedious stuff thanks to software (and it's equally boring or even moreso in hardware).

Sampling. In theory a great idea, in practice there's lots of tedious crap you have to deal with.

DAWs. All interfaces are 2 decades old and there's still so much to innovate but it doesn't happen.

MIDI. The only way to deal with older equipment and nobody can do this right.

Also, is there something other people think you're good at, but you think you suck at?

Playing keyboard. Well, saying I suck is perhaps false modesty, but I feel I don't deserve the compliment.

For all the intelligence and knowledge that technology empowers us with, the lazy and stupid is amplified along with it (Staticstarter)


#20 Torzelan

Torzelan

    Mudkip (+150)

  • Members
  • 155 posts
  • LocationN. Sweden

Posted 14 April 2012 - 08:32 PM

Maybe I'm stretching it but there is nothing that turns me off about making music more than CPU overload (which occurs oh, all the time on my POS machine). I hit way too many walls that I have to tediously work around because of this and it completely kills the mood.

I am very bad at making money (as in, even when I work) to afford a new computer...

Speaking of work; rarely am I so motivated and full of ideas as when walking there, and you bet all that is destroyed during the following 9 hours. Boo.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


games | mixes | artists | albums